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1. For this Forum, you need to read Part I "Getting Started" in your textbook.

2. Answer the below questions based on the given scenario:

You are a new supervisor (you have been there 2 weeks) at a large organization that develops technology for the military. You are retired military and just finished your Bachelor’s Degree in Management from APUS. You are doing well so far, with one exception. There are three employees who work for you, that are not responsive to your tasking. You have to constantly remind them of due dates and their work is marginal. You decided to counsel each of them, in private. After the counseling sessions, you found that all three employees say that you use Positional Power too much and are not receptive to their ideas.

A. How will you handle this situation?

B. What is the difference between positional power and personal power? (in your own words)

C. Give an example, from your personal life, of situations where you have used (or had used on you) both positional and personal power.

Getting Started

“ Leadership is the ability to decide what is to be done and then to get others to want to do it.”

—Dwight D.Elsenhower

P A R T 1

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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The Opportunity

You are in for an exciting journey. As a general rule, supervisors have more responsibility and make more money than other employees. Supervising also involves more work and greater stress. Supervisory positions are challenging because you become responsible for more results even though you don’t do all the jobs. That’s the opportunity. If you can improve performance through your efforts with a small group, you can do it with larger groups as you learn more, develop your skills, and progress in your career.

Why Do You Want to Supervise Others? Place a check ( ) next to all the reasons that apply.

To increase your job satisfaction

To challenge your skills

To learn and grow

To gain more responsibility

To make more money

To achieve a personal goal

To gain confidence

Other:

Make no mistake about it, there will be problems. A new supervisor called a close friend after work one night and said, “Bill, I can’t stand it. Every day, people are late or absent. And sometimes, the quality of the work is so poor. What’s the matter with these employees? I don’t know if I’m cut out for this.”

Many people become supervisors because they have skill or experience in doing a particular job. Whatever your reason, doing the job while supervising others is a different ball game from just doing the job. Successful supervisors have a unique skill set that you’ll learn in this book. These skills involve understanding the dynamics of working through people, communicating well with others, learning performance- management skills, effectively coaching others, and handling change positively.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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4

How Do You Transition to Supervisor?

When you transition to supervisor, three key areas need your attention:

Personal needs

Other departments’ needs

Employees’ needs

This book will give you ideas, applications, and strategies for all areas. First you must clarify your role, goals, and job description. That’s what this chapter is about. Next, you need to smoothly begin working with others. In addition to serving external customers, treat other departments as customers also. Get to know your internal customers, listen to their concerns, and improve your area’s service with them.

Often, the most critical transition is with the employees. Sometimes it is awkward, especially if some are your friends. Here are some tactics that will help you get off on the right foot. Place a check ( ) next to all that you feel you can do. Add any other thoughts.

First Steps

Have your manager introduce you in your new role at a meeting.

At the meeting, explain your excitement and other feelings about the job.

Keep your early interactions with employees “low key.” Don’t come off too strong.

Meet with employees one-on-one to discuss their jobs. Keep the first time informal. Listen and ask for ideas to make things better.

Hold a department or work-group meeting. Be positive and discuss your goal to help reach the department’s objectives. Share company information you may have.

Observe people in action, help out where appropriate, and listen for ways to improve.

Ask a few employees for their thoughts on changes you may want to make. Seek their input.

Introduce changes more slowly if performance is good. Change things more quickly if performance is poor.

Other:

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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The Definition of a Supervisor

A training consultant was conducting a seminar for new supervisors at a large manufacturing company. After a couple of sessions, one of the participants told the consultant that she liked the class but, more important, appreciated the references to working with or through employees. She commented that most supervisors she knows tell employees that they work for them. The participant added, “There is a difference.”

A supervisor must work with and through employees to get the job done on time with the highest quality and within budget. Excellence in Supervision means achieving positive results through people. It’s called influencing people. Influencing skills involve two types of power:

Personal Power: influencing people to do things because they “want to”

Position Power: influencing people to do things because they “have to”

Excellent supervisors positively influence people: employees, co-workers, and customers. They do it with extraordinary personal power. This book will give you skills and strategies to do this.

To start, answer the questions on the next page about experiences you’ve had that will help you become an excellent supervisor.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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DEFINING EXCELLENCE Learning from your past experiences will help you do well as a supervisor. Answer each question below to help you define excellence in supervision.

1. From your experience, what makes employees respect a supervisor?

2. From your experience, what causes employees to dislike a supervisor?

3. How do you want to be viewed as a supervisor? Is there anything you need to learn to help you achieve that?

4. What skills do you already have that will help you succeed?

5. What definition would you give to an excellent supervisor?

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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The Role of a Supervisor

What is your role as a supervisor? Place a check ( ) next to any roles that apply, or add your own:

Produce a part or create product

Perform a service

Fix a technical problem

Correct a mechanical failure

Lead a creative team

Sell a product or service

Organize a marketing plan

Serve the public

Help serve patients

Provide customer service

Create a computer solution

Educate students

Administer public safety

Solve problems

Transport people

Others:

What duties will you perform in order to fulfill your role? For example, if you provide customer service for a retail company, as a supervisor you will need to train employees, communicate with others, handle performance issues, build teamwork, and think creatively.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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IDENTIFYING Your Role

Rank your top 10 of the following duties, from 1 to 10, for their importance in your role as a supervisor. Then, give yourself a (+) if you feel confident in that area and a (-) if you need to learn more.

1=Most Important 10=Least Important

Duties Rank of Confidence Importance Level (+ or -)

1. Handle problems fairly

2. Implement company policy

3. Delegate tasks

4. Train employees

5. Handle change positively

6. Recognize employees

7. Maintain a safe work area

8. Make decisions

9. Communicate effectively

10. Solves problem effectively

11. Think creatively

12. Complete reports on a timely basis

13. Gather employee suggestions

14. Build teamwork in employees

15. Take responsibility for results

16. Coach and motivate employees

17. Develop quality in the operation

18. Set standards and goals

19. Evaluate performance

20. Provide the proper equipment and tools

Note: “These 20 items were the most common comments from supervisors who were ashed to identify their roles.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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The Responsibilities Supervisors have tremendous responsibility in today’s diverse workforce. Put a check ( ) next to the responsibilities below that you agree with and add others you believe are important.

Recognize employees for a job well done.

Treat all employees respectfully, fairly, honestly, and with dignity.

Keep employees informed about the company and your area’s goals and results.

Be positive and encouraging to employees.

Show interest in each employee as a person.

Give employees an opportunity to learn and grow through ongoing training and education.

Deal with performance issues consistently and fairly.

Help employees develop teamwork and a sense of belonging.

Be a good listener to employee problems and suggestions.

Encourage initiative and new ideas.

Communicate your belief in people’s potential and the importance of the work being done.

Support and represent your employees in the company.

Accept your own mistakes openly and learn from them.

Be accountable for your results. This is leadership.

Other:

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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The Supervisor’s Job Description

To succeed as a supervisor, you need to know your job description and how your success will be determined. Some companies provide written job descriptions. If your company does this, review it with your manager. If it doesn’t, talk to your manager about your duties anyway. The ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.” You absolutely want to be stepping in the right direction. All good performance begins with:

Clear expectations of the job duties and priorities

Clear performance goals

In the pages that follow, you’ll find a process for clarifying your expectations and goals.

A Sample Job Description Read the sample job description below. Put a check ( ) next to the areas that pertain to your job. This is important for you and your employees because 80% of performance issues relate to unclear expectations, goals, and roles.

Ensures that the department or work area achieves its goals in a quality and timely manner

Trains and motivates employees to complete their job duties in a quality and timely manner

Communicates regularly and effectively with employees and others at all levels

Creates a positive work environment that supports good morale, quality work, and high productivity

Implements and follows the human-resource and safety policies of the company or organization

Develops teamwork within the work area or department and with other areas of the company

Ensures that employees have the proper equipment and tools to do their jobs

Completes all necessary paperwork and reports thoroughly and on time

Maintains a work atmosphere that contributes to employees sharing ideas for continuous improvement

Fulfills all related duties of the position

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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WRITING YOUR JOB DESCRIPTION

Write your job description in the space below. Then review it with your manager and discuss priorities.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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Management Thought Old versus New Management thought and practice has changed and improved since the early 1900s. The illustration below outlines the progression.

Influential management consultant Frederick Taylor preached the science of management in the early 20th century. Under his approach, people were like parts to a mass-production line. If everything was in its place, person and machine, the job could be controlled and produced efficiently.

The Theory X approach says employees don’t like work and need to be closely controlled to perform. Theory Y’s approach says employees do like work—get them involved and they’ll succeed.

Recent studies suggest that the best managers and supervisors use both direction and participation to achieve excellent results. Excellence in Supervision supports this balanced, flexible approach.

More and more today, because of the rapid change in organizations, employees’ performance can provide a company with a competitive advantage. Employee performance can make or break a company. Supervisors have the biggest influence on this. Supervisors need skills that help them get and keep the best people and then build employees into high-performing teams.

Two key questions are critical to a supervisor:

What do employees need to succeed? (people issues)

What does the organization need to achieve results? (production issues)

The chart on the next page differentiates old-school from currrent views.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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MANAGEMENT STYLE Put a check ( ) next to the words that describe how you want to be viewed.

OLD SCHOOL NEW SCHOOL

boss team leader

authoritarian communicator

controller coach

organizer facilitator

expert listener

cop problem solver

referee cheerleader

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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14

Read the quotes below about employees’ experiences with poor supervisors.

Then answer the questions.

“A few years ago, I had a supervisor that ruled with an iron fist. Life in the

department was pretty miserable. It got to the point where I didn’t want to go to

work, let alone do anything while I was there. Each Monday, she would start

riding/criticizing one person for the week. The following Monday, it was someone

else’s turn.”

“The worst supervisor I had was narrow minded, had no vision, and always

played it safe. He never tried anything new. So, he came off as a know-it-all.

And, he would never stand up for you if the going got tough.”

“One day I was working when my back and left side started to ache. I went

to first aid, and they sent me to a clinic. The doctor said I had a pinched nerve.

When I told my supervisor, the only thing he said to me was, ‘I suppose you

can’t do anything now, can you?’ ”

“A supervisor I had never gave me any direction on a new project. I struggled

to make progress. As time went on, I put in long hours to complete it and one

week worked 20 hours on a Saturday. My supervisor even asked me to work

Sunday with no recognition or support for all the other extra hours. I didn’t, and

he held it against me.”

1. What did the supervisors do that are examples of poorly working through others?

2. How do you think these supervisors affected the performance of the employees?

3. What can you learn or relearn from these four situations?

Compare your responses answers to the author’s suggestions in the back of the book.

CASE STUDY 1

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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Strategies for Getting Started

Review the strategies below, put a check ( ) next to the ones you plan to use. For the strategies to work best, you need to adapt them to your situation using good judgment and common sense.

Obtain a copy of your job description. Read it and then discuss it with your manager to clarify goals, expectations, and priorities. If no job description is available, use the one you made on page 11.

Talk to and interview three other supervisors or managers whom you admire. Include only one from your company so you can obtain perceptions that are different from your current situation. Along with other concerns you have, ask them:

How they help people stay motivated

How they handle problems

How they keep a good attitude

Make a plan to complete this book and act on the strategies. Make a commitment to keep learning. Over the next six to 12 months, attend two seminars and read three other books. Include Excellence in Management, which is the next step after Excellence in Supervision. See the Recommended Reading list at the end of this book for other ideas.

Develop a written plan for your work area. In the plan, outline goals related to your priorities and action steps to follow through. Review this with someone close to you to get some objective feedback. Then, meet with your manager to discuss it. Ask your manager for feedback, and make any needed adjustments.

Meet with your manager a couple of times a month for 30–60 minutes to review results.

Update him or her on your progress

Discuss problems and your ideas for solutions

Get input and new information from your manager

If your manager doesn’t suggest these kinds of meetings, request them in a positive way. If he or she won’t agree to the meetings, find another manager who is willing to help you with this. Creating, sharing, and refining your plan will help you focus, maintain a good attitude, and keep improving.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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ACTION PLAN: GETTING STARTED

Create an action plan for your work area that will help you succeed in supervision. Add to the plan as you read this book and complete the activities. When you have completed the book, check your progress on the plan below and use the results to create a new action plan. The Action Plan: Keep Excelling in the back of this book will help ensure that you apply what you have learned and keep improving in your role as a supervisor.

1. Describe the goals and priorities for your department.

2. List six action steps you will take to Timeline prepare to win.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:24:18.

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Excellence in Supervision Essential Skills for the New Supervisor

Rick Conlow

CREDITS: Senior Editor: Debbie Woodbury Editor: Eileen Cohen Production Editor: Jill Zayszly Production Manager: Judy Petry Design: Nicole Phillips Cartoonist: Ralph Mapson

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means now known or to be invented, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system without written permission from the author or publisher, except for the brief inclusion of quotations in a review.

© 2004 Crisp Publications, Inc. Printed in Canada by Webcom Limited

www.crisplearning.com

02 03 04 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 2001087418 Conlow, Rick Excellence in Supervision ISBN 1-56052-611-4

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:23:47.

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EXCELLENCE IN SUPERVISION

Learning Objectives For:

The objectives for Excellence in Supervision are listed below. They have been developed to guide you, the reader, to the core issues covered in this book.

THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS BOOK ARE:

1) To describe the new roles and responsibilities that accompany a promotion to supervisor

2) To explain the principles and processes of performance management

3) To provide guidelines for communicating effectively with employees, peers, and managers

4) To explore how effective coaching skills can lead to increased employee satisfaction and productivity

5) To provide supervisors with strategies for dealing with organizational change

ASSESSING YOUR PROGRESS

In addition to the learning objectives, Crisp Learning has developed an assessment that covers the fundamental information presented in this book. A 25-item, multiple-choice and true-false questionnaire allows the reader to evaluate his or her comprehension of the subject matter. To learn how to obtain a copy of this assessment, please call 1–800–442–7477 and ask to speak with a Customer Service Representative.

Assessments should not be used in any employee selection process.

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:23:47.

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Excellence in Supervision

Essential Skills for the New Supervisor

Rick Conlow

A Fif ty-Minute™ Series Book

This Fifty-Minute™ book is designed to be “read with a pencil.” It is an excellent workbook for self-study as well as classroom learning. All material is copyright-protected and cannot be duplicated without permission from the publisher. Therefore, be sure to order a copy for every training participant by contacting:

1-800-442-7477

CripLearning.com

<i>Excellence in Supervision : Essential Skills for the New Supervisor</i>, edited by Debbie Woodbury, et al., Course Technology Crisp, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/apus/detail.action?docID=3116904. Created from apus on 2019-10-07 06:23:38.

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