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100 word response 1 reference

Jennifer

When discussing military culture, one has to address their strong values and how these values dictate their behavior. One also has to consider that military culture is an organized culture, which follows rules and guidelines set forth by the people in leadership roles. Organized culture can be described as, ‘a pattern of shared assumptions that the group learned as it solved its problems of external adaptation and internal integration, that worked well enough to be considered valid and, therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way to perceive, think and feel in relation to these problems.’ (English, 2004, p. 18). Based on this definition, I think of military culture as being separate from popular culture. After all, most people in the military have the responsibility of defending our country and that entails a different perspective than those of us who live civilian lives. 

Military culture tends to be focused on the following parts: ‘discipline, ceremonial displays and etiquette, and cohesion and espirit de corps.’ I asked my husband who was in the military for about ten years what espirit de corps means in a military culture. He explained that it loosely translates to pride in your group, which usually means pride in your branch of the military. There are marked cultural differences among the different branches of the military as well. The Air Force, Marines, Army and Navy all have their own mini-cultural traditions specific to their branches. These traditions are carried out at celebrations and ceremonial displays, many based on the triumphs of the military branch. Communication within the military is largely based on rank. The way that other soldiers communicated with my husband based on his rank of lieutenant was quite a shock to me at first. The saluting and the way he was addressed as ‘sir’ all threw me for a loop. 

When my husband and I were first married, I was introduced to military culture and found it vastly different from my own civilian one. I had some preconceived notions about what kind of culture I would experience which turned out to be wrong. My preconceived notions were based on television and movies and how military life was portrayed. A bunch of rag tag individuals who finally band together to form a cohesive group was something that I thought happened all of the time. In fact, the military is built of regular people who feel a higher calling to their country. 

 

100 word response 1 reference

Jennife

r

When discussing military culture, one has to address their

strong values and how these values dictate their behavior. One

also has to consider that military culture is an organized culture,

which foll

ows rules and guidelines set forth by the people in

leadership roles. Organized culture can be described as, ‘a

pattern of shared assumptions that the group learned as it

solved its problems of external adaptation and internal

integration, that worked well

enough to be considered valid and,

therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way to

perceive, think and feel in relation to these problems.’ (English,

2004, p. 18). Based on this definition, I think of military culture

as being separate from p

opular culture. After all, most people in

the military have the responsibility of defending our country and

that entails a different perspective than those of us who live

civilian lives.

Military culture tends to be focused on the following parts:

‘discip

line, ceremonial displays and etiquette, and cohesion and

espirit de corps.’ I asked my husband who was in the military for

about ten years what espirit de corps means in a military

culture. He explained that it loosely translates to pride in your

group, w

hich usually means pride in your branch of the military.

There are marked cultural differences among the different

branches of the military as well. The Air Force, Marines, Army

and Navy all have their own mini

cultural traditions specific to

their branche

s. These traditions are carried out at celebrations

100 word response 1 reference

Jennifer

When discussing military culture, one has to address their

strong values and how these values dictate their behavior. One

also has to consider that military culture is an organized culture,

which follows rules and guidelines set forth by the people in

leadership roles. Organized culture can be described as, ‘a

pattern of shared assumptions that the group learned as it

solved its problems of external adaptation and internal

integration, that worked well enough to be considered valid and,

therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way to

perceive, think and feel in relation to these problems.’ (English,

2004, p. 18). Based on this definition, I think of military culture

as being separate from popular culture. After all, most people in

the military have the responsibility of defending our country and

that entails a different perspective than those of us who live

civilian lives.

Military culture tends to be focused on the following parts:

‘discipline, ceremonial displays and etiquette, and cohesion and

espirit de corps.’ I asked my husband who was in the military for

about ten years what espirit de corps means in a military

culture. He explained that it loosely translates to pride in your

group, which usually means pride in your branch of the military.

There are marked cultural differences among the different

branches of the military as well. The Air Force, Marines, Army

and Navy all have their own mini-cultural traditions specific to

their branches. These traditions are carried out at celebrations