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Assignment Content

  1.    Ethical decision making requires the ability to analyze situations for potential ethical concerns, and then forming an appropriate ethical response based on ethical guidelines and legal statutes. This assignment allows you to apply the concepts and skills that you have learned to enhance your ethical decision making.

    Review each Ethical Case Scenario.

    Answer the Ethical Case Scenarios for further analysis. Each scenario includes thought-provoking questions; however, you will not submit your responses to these questions. These questions are designed to assist in your ethical decision-making process.

    Complete the Ethical Case Scenarios Worksheet by responding to the questions within the worksheet below                                                                                           
    Submit your Assignment.

   

University of Phoenix Material 

Ethical Scenarios Worksheet

Choose three of the seven ethical case scenarios.

Answer the following questions for each scenario in 75 to 100 words each.

1. What is the ethical issue described in the scenario? Why is this an ethical issue?

2. Which state laws apply to this scenario? Why are these laws applicable?

3. Which ACA ethical codes apply to this scenario? Why are these codes applicable?

4. What is the proper ethical response for the counselor in this situation?

 

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Case Study #31

Protecting Children, the Elderly, and Dependent Adults From Harm

Preventing harm to self and others. Henrietta is aware that her elderly client, Omar, has had his driver's license revoked due to several minor accidents. She notices, however, that Omar drives himself to his therapy session. She shares her concern with him, and Omar leaves the session in an agitated state and does not return.

Question 1: Does the therapist have a duty to notify authorities?

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Question 2: Rather than inform the authorities, would you be inclined to inform the family? Why or why not?

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Question 3: If you disclosed, could this be considered a breach of confidentiality?

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Question 4: How might you handle this situation differently?

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Case Study #3

Dealing With Suspected Unethical Behavior of Colleagues

Reporting a colleague's behavior. One of Dr. Martinson's private practice clients, Sara, divulges she had an affair with her former counselor who is employed in the same agency as Dr. Martinson. Sara also reports that the other counselor had been physically and sexually abusive towards her 4-year-old son. Dr. Martinson decides not to say anything to his accused colleague. He telephones the Department of Social Services to report the alleged child abuse, and also to the state licensure board for professional counselors to report the alleged sexual activity between the former counselor, the client, and her son.

Question 1: What are your thoughts concerning Dr. Martinson's course of action?

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Question 2: What might you have done if you were Dr. Martinson?

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Case Study #20

The Client's Right to Give Informed Consent

When to inform the client. During the course of therapy, Sergio provides his therapist (Carol) with his private journal. He hopes it will augment his therapy as well as safeguard it from the wife that he is presently divorcing. Sometime later, Carol refers Sergio to a colleague who is more experienced in his problem area. At the time of the referral, Carol gives Sergio's journal to the new therapist. Several weeks later, Sergio requests the return of his journal. Carol informs him that she has given his journal to his new therapist.

Question 1: Was Carol justified in handing over the journal to the new therapist solely because she believed that it would be helpful to Sergio?

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Question 2: Would you consider her behavior ethical? Why or why not?

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Question 3: If Sergio was requesting the journal to give to his new therapist, would that make a difference? Explain.

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Case Study #22

The Professional's Responsibilities in Record Keeping

Parental rights for records. A 17-year-old boy was initially referred by his mother to be seen by you as a counselor in private practice for anger management. After three months of counseling, the boy turns 18. The mother is noticing "strange behavior" from her son and demands to see her child's clinical records. You refuse to release the records, informing her that the client is no longer a minor.

Question 1: Was the counselor's refusal to oblige to the request made by the client's mother appropriate? Why or why not?

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Question 2: What are the guidelines for parental/legal guardian access to their child's counseling clinical records?

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Question 3: How does your state define a "minor" pertaining to the legal rights of a parent/legal guardian to have access to their child's counseling/psychotherapy client records?

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Case Study #24

Ethical Issues in Online Counseling

Online counseling. Dr. Tramm decided to broaden her counseling practice by engaging in online counseling. She attended several workshops, developed an informed consent package, and asked each new counselee to inform her of any previous counseling experience (and how it helped or did not help). She also asked new clients if they ever had suicidal ideation or any suicidal attempts. Everything seemed to go smoothly for a time, until a client, George, who was going through a painful marital breakup, got online and told Dr.Tramm that he could no longer continue to live in this kind of pain and then signed off. Each time she emailed him, or called him on the phone number he had given her, she got no response.

Question 1: What potential ethical issues do you see in this case?

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Question 2: What would you do in this case?

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Question 3: Can you think of anything that Dr.Tramm might have done that could have helped her in this case?

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Case Study #27

Confidentiality, Privileged Communication, and Privacy

Confidentiality with a team. Veronica is working at a local mental health center. She is a member of treatment team in which each counselor is assigned individual clients. The team is utilized for case consultations each week during staff meetings. When Veronica discusses the limitations of confidentiality with her clients, she explains the possible reasons for breaking confidentiality as immediate danger to self or others, abuse of children or elderly, and court orders. Veronica does not share the team consultation process with her clients because it is inherent in the organizational process.

Question 1: Do you view team consultation within an agency as a breach of confidentiality?

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Question 2: Which ethical standards apply to this situation?

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Question 3: Can you think of any other situations in which you may be indirectly breaching confidentiality and may not think of sharing with your clients?

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Case Study #30

The Duty to Warn and to Protect

Right to live or die. Jane is a counselor who primarily sees people with HIV or those with other chronic conditions. She is often referred individuals with mental health issues from local organizations and clinics. She recently received a call from an agency saying they were referring a man named Spencer because they were concerned about possible suicidality. Spencer made an appointment and Jane gave him her standard intake paperwork. At the start of the session she says, "I noticed you didn't sign the informed consent form. Do you have some questions or concerns you would like to discuss before we begin?" Spencer replies that he wants to know what she means by the statements regarding her possibly breaking confidentiality or taking some course of action if she is concerned he may hurt himself or others. As Jane begins her standard response to the limits of confidentiality, Spencer interrupts and says that he believes it is his right to decide whether to live or to die and if she cannot accept that then she should just refer him to someone who will be more respectful of his values.

Question 1: What would you do if you were Jane?

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Question 2: What are your own beliefs about the “right to suicide?”

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Question 3: Could you agree to Spencer’s conditions for having therapy with you?

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