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Assignment:

Submit your presentation. Using the PowerPoint template provided, address the following topics and questions in approximately 9-10 slides, excluding references: See attachments for instructions 

*** Please use attached template to complete assignment

**** 2–3 bullet points per slide

****Along with an accompanying script in the Notes section of each slide  

***** No plagiarism   

**** Presentation ends with a clear actionable Call to Action.

Assignment: Your Role as a Manager in Creating a Positive, Inclusive Workplace Culture: Toward a More Positive and Inclusive Culture

For your final presentation to managers, you will focus on helping managers to create a more positive, inclusive culture. As in the prior 2 weeks, provide 2–3 bullet points per slide, along with an accompanying script in the Notes section of each slide that you would use if you were delivering the presentation to a group of managers. As in Weeks 1 and 2, be sure your presentation ends with a clear, actionable Call to Action.

As you prepare your presentation and script, be sure to cover all items outlined, including the incorporation of references to appropriate academic sources, such as those found in the Learning Resources, or those in the Walden Library.

To prepare for this Assignment:

Review, as needed, the following resource, which includes links to helpful information:

·
How To Create A Positive Workplace Culture (forbes.com)

· Neutralizing A Negative Workplace – See pdf

·
Types of Diversity in the Workplace & Examples – The Definitive Guide [2021] by Diversity.Social

· The new analytics of culture – See pdf

· Use Template for Week 3 assignment –

see attachment



Assignment:

Submit your presentation. Using the PowerPoint template provided, address the following topics and questions in
approximately 9–10 slides
, excluding references:

· Use Template for Week 3 assignment –

see attachment


Part 1: Toward a More Positive Culture

· Synthesize the effects of having a positive work culture—as well as the effects of not having one. 

· How does this impact the organization?

· How does this impact individuals and teams?

· Call to Action: Propose a set of key steps that managers in your selected organization can take to move toward greater positivity. 


Part 2: Toward a More Inclusive Culture

· Examine what it means for an organization to have an inclusive culture. 

· Distinguish between diversity and inclusion. 

· In what ways are they the same?

· In what ways are they different?

· Analyze the importance of diversity and inclusion to an organization.

· What are the positive effects of incorporating diversity and inclusion into the culture?

· What challenges might you encounter when incorporating these ideas into the culture?

· Call to Action: Develop a list of key steps managers in your selected organization can take to better incorporate diversity and inclusion into organizational culture and practices. 

· No plagiarism

· APA citing

Your Role as a Manager in Creating a Positive, Inclusive Workplace Culture: Toward a More Positive and Inclusive Culture

Your Name

Master of Business Administration, Walden University

WMBA 6010: Managing People and Promoting Collaboration

Instructor’s Name

Month XX, 202X

[Template Notes: A script is not needed for this page. Complete the missing information on this slide: your name, Instructor’s name, and date. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

1

[Template Notes]

[Note: Delete this slide before submitting your Assignment. This Assignment Template is based off the APA Presentation Template (APA 7) found on the General Templates page of the Walden Writing Center. The template found on this page provides additional information that may be helpful. Be sure to refer to the notes area of each slide for further instructions, including whether a script is needed.]

[Template Notes: A script is not needed for this page. Be sure to delete this slide before submitting your Assignment.]

2

Part 1: Toward a More Positive Culture

[Template Notes: A script is not needed for this page. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

3

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

4

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

5

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

6

Part 2: Toward a More Inclusive Culture

[Template Notes: A script is not needed for this page. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

7

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

8

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

9

[Note: Add slide content. Delete this information in brackets.]

[Template Notes: In this area, insert your script for this slide. Add additional slides as necessary. Be sure to delete this information in brackets.]

10

References

[Delete all information in brackets. Include a reference list at the end of your presentation. Reference list entries take the same format they would in a paper. For more information about formatting your reference list, please visit the following site: https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/apa/references.]

11

REPRINT R2001E
PUBLISHED IN HBR
JANUARY–FEBRUARY 2020

ARTICLE
ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
The New Analytics
of Culture
What email, Slack, and Glassdoor reveal about your organization
by Matthew Corritore, Amir Goldberg, and Sameer B. Srivastava

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What email, Slack, and Glassdoor
reveal about your organization

Matthew
Corritore
Assistant
professor,
McGill
University

Amir
Goldberg
Associate
professor,
Stanford
University

A U T H O R S

P H OTO G R A P H E R   JEAN-PIERRE AT TAL

Sameer B.
Srivastava
Associate
professor,
University of
California,
Berkeley

O R G A N I Z AT I O N A L
C U LT U R E

T H E N E W

A N A LY T I C S

O F C U LT U R E

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Yet the tools available for measuring it—namely, employee
surveys and questionnaires—have significant shortcomings.
Employee self-reports are often unreliable. The values and
beliefs that people say are important to them, for example,
are often not reflected in how they actually behave. More-
over, surveys provide static, or at best episodic, snapshots
of organizations that are constantly evolving. And they’re
limited by researchers’ tendency to assume that distinctive
and idiosyncratic cultures can be neatly categorized into a
few common types.

Our research focuses on a new method for assessing
and measuring organizational culture. We used big-data
processing to mine the ubiquitous “digital traces” of
culture in electronic communications, such as emails,
Slack messages, and Glassdoor reviews. By studying the
language employees use in these communications, we can
measure how culture actually influences their thoughts
and behavior at work.

In one study, two of us partnered with a midsize tech-
nology company to assess the degree of cultural fit between
employees and their colleagues on the basis of similarity
of linguistic style expressed in internal email messages. In
a separate study, two of us analyzed the content of Slack
messages exchanged among members of nearly 120 software
development teams. We examined the diversity of thoughts,
ideas, and meaning expressed by team members and then
measured whether it was beneficial or detrimental to team
performance. We also partnered with employer-review web-
site Glassdoor to analyze how employees talk about their
organizations’ culture in anonymous reviews to examine

O R G A N I Z AT I O N A L
C U LT U R E

A B U S I N E S S ’ S C U LT U R E

C A N C ATA LY Z E O R

U N D E R M I N E S U C C E S S .

ABOUT THE ART

In his project Cells, photographer Jean-Pierre
Attal explores the social urban archaeology of

modern office towers, revealing the recurrence
of patterns and postures found inside.

4 Harvard Business ReviewJanuary–February 2020
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I D E A I N B R I E F

THE PROBLEM
Culture is easy to sense
but difficult to measure.
The workhorses of
culture research—
employee surveys and
questionnaires—are
often unreliable.

A NEW APPROACH
Studying the language
that employees
use in electronic
communication has
opened a new window
into organizational
culture. Research
analyzing email,
Slack messages, and
Glassdoor postings is
challenging prevailing
wisdom about culture.

THE FINDINGS
• Cultural fit is

important, but what
predicts success most
is the rate at which
employees adapt as
organizational culture
changes over time.

• Cognitive diversity
helps teams during
ideation but hinders
execution.

• The best cultures
encourage diversity
to drive innovation
but are anchored by
shared core beliefs.

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the effects of cultural diversity on organizational efficiency
and innovation.

The explosion of digital trace data such as emails and
Slack communications—together with the availability of
computational methods that are faster, cheaper, and easier to
use—has ushered in a new scientific approach to measuring
culture. Our computational-lingustics approach is challeng-
ing prevailing assumptions in the field of people analytics
and revealing novel insights about how managers can
harness culture as a strategic resource. We believe that with
appropriate measures to safeguard employee privacy and
minimize algorithmic bias it holds great promise as a tool for
managers grappling with culture issues in their firms.

T H E S T U D I E S
Our recent studies have focused on cultural fit versus adapt-
ability, the pros and cons of fitting in, cognitive diversity, and
the effects of diversity on organizational performance. Let’s
look at each in detail.

Fit versus adaptability. When managers think about hir-
ing for cultural fit, they focus almost exclusively on whether
candidates reflect the values, norms, and behaviors of the
team or organization as it currently exists. They often fail to
consider cultural adaptability—the ability to rapidly learn
and conform to organizational cultural norms as they change
over time. In a recent study two of us conducted with Stan-
ford’s V. Govind Manian and Christopher Potts, we analyzed
how cultural fit and cultural adaptability affected individual
performance at a high-tech company by comparing linguis-
tic styles expressed in more than 10 million internal email
messages exchanged over five years among 601 employees.
For example, we looked at the extent to which an employee
used swear words when communicating with colleagues who
themselves cursed frequently or used personal pronouns
(“we” or “I”) that matched those used by her peer group.
We also tracked how employees adapted to their peers’
cultural conventions over time.

We found, as expected, that a high level of cultural fit led
to more promotions, more-favorable performance evalua-
tions, higher bonuses, and fewer involuntary departures.
Cultural adaptability, however, turned out to be even more

important for success. Employees who could quickly adapt
to cultural norms as they changed over time were more
successful than employees who exhibited high cultural fit
when first hired. These cultural “adapters” were better able
to maintain fit when cultural norms changed or evolved,
which is common in organizations operating in fast-moving,
dynamic environments.

These results suggest that the process of cultural align-
ment does not end at the point of hire. Indeed, our study
also found that employees followed distinct enculturation
trajectories—at certain times in their tenure demonstrating
more cultural fit with colleagues and at other times less. Most
eventually adapted to the behavioral norms of their peers,
and those who stayed at their company exhibited increas-
ing cultural fit over time. Employees who were eventually
terminated were those who had been unable to adapt to the
culture. Employees who left voluntarily were the most fasci-
nating: They quickly adapted culturally early in their tenures
but drifted out of step later on and were likely to leave the
firm once they became cultural outsiders.

To further assess how cultural fit and adaptability affect
performance, Berkeley’s Jennifer Chatman and Richard Lu
and two of us surveyed employees at the same high-tech
company to measure value congruence (the extent to which
employees’ core values and beliefs about a desirable work-
place fit with their peers) and perceptual congruence (how
well employees can read the “cultural code” by accurately
reporting the values held by peers). We found that value
congruence is predictive of retention—employees with it are
less likely to voluntarily leave the company—but is unrelated
to job performance. We found that the opposite is true of
perceptual congruence: It is predictive of higher job perfor-
mance but unrelated to retention. These results suggest that
companies striving to foster a stable and committed work-
force should focus on hiring candidates who share similar
values with current employees. Employers needing people
who can quickly assimilate and be productive should pay
greater attention to candidates who demonstrate the ability
to adapt to new cultural contexts.

The benefits of not fitting in. When might it better to
hire a cultural misfit? People who see the world differently
and have diverse ideas and perspectives often bring creativ-
ity and innovation to an organization. But because of their
outsider status, they may struggle to have their ideas recog-
nized by colleagues as legitimate. In a recent study two of us
conducted with V. Govind Manian, Christopher Potts, and
William Monroe, we compared employees’ levels of cultural
fit with the extent to which they served as a bridge between
otherwise disconnected groups in the firm’s internal com-
munication network. For instance, an employee might have
connections with colleagues that bridge both the engineering

O R G A N I Z AT I O N A L
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6 Harvard Business ReviewJanuary–February 2020
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and sales departments, allowing her to access and pass on
a greater variety of information and ideas.

Consistent with prior work, we found that cultural fit was,
on average, positively associated with career success. The
benefits of fitting in culturally were especially great for indi-
viduals who served as network bridges. When traversing the
boundary between engineering and sales, for example, they
could hold their own in technical banter with the former and
in customer-oriented discourse with the latter. People who
attempted to span boundaries but could not display cultural
ambidexterity were especially penalized: They were seen
as both cultural outsiders and social outsiders without clear
membership in any particular social clique. However, we
also identified a set of individuals who benefited from being
cultural misfits: those who did not have networks spanning
disparate groups but instead had strong connections within a
defined social clique. By building trusting social bonds with
colleagues, they were able to overcome their outsider status
and leverage their distinctiveness. These results suggest that
an effective hiring strategy should strive for a portfolio of
both conformists—or at least those who can rapidly adapt
to a company’s changing culture—and cultural misfits.

Cognitive diversity. Proponents of cultural diversity
in teams presume that it leads to cognitive diversity; that
is, diversity in thoughts and ideas. But the findings about
whether cognitive diversity helps or hinders team perfor-
mance are inconclusive. Part of the problem is that these
studies use imperfect proxies for cognitive diversity, such
as diversity in demographics, personalities, or self-reported
beliefs and values. Moreover, this line of research has rarely
looked at how diversity is actually expressed in communica-
tions and interactions, which is problematic given that team
members are sometimes reluctant to share their real feelings
and opinions. Finally, cognitive diversity is often assumed to
be static, even though we know team dynamics frequently
change over a project’s life cycle.

In a new study, which two of us conducted with Stan-
ford researchers Katharina Lix and Melissa Valentine, we
overcame these challenges by analyzing the content of Slack
messages exchanged among team members of 117 remote
software-development teams. We identified instances when
team members discussing similar topics used diverse mean-
ings, perspectives, and styles, and then analyzed the impact
of that diversity on performance. For example, in discus-
sions of customer requirements, different interpretations of
the desired look and feel of the user interface in some cases
led developers to talk past one another and fail to coordinate
but in other cases sparked creative new ideas.

Our results indicate that the performance consequences
of cognitive diversity vary as a function of project milestone
stages. In the early stages, when the team is defining the

problem at hand, diversity lowers the chances of successfully
meeting milestones. During middle stages, when the team is
most likely to be engaged in ideation, diversity increases the
likelihood of team success. Diversity becomes an obstacle
again toward the end of a project, when the team is deep
into execution.

Cultural diversity and the organization as a whole.
We’ve seen that there are trade-offs associated with diver-
sity in teams, but how does it affect the performance of
entire organizations? Conventional wisdom holds that firms
must choose between a homogeneous, efficient culture
and a diverse, innovative culture. A homogeneous culture
improves efficiency and coordination, the theory goes,
because employees agree about the norms and beliefs guid-
ing work, but the benefits come at the expense of fewer novel
ideas about how to accomplish tasks. In contrast, a hetero-
geneous culture sacrifices the benefits of consensus in favor
of healthy disagreement among employees that can promote
adaptability and innovation. The evidence supporting this
thinking, however, is scant and inconclusive.

In a recent study, we analyzed the language that employ-
ees used when describing their organization’s culture (for
example, “our culture is collaborative,” “our culture is entre-
preneurial,” and so on) in anonymous reviews of nearly 500
publicly traded companies on Glassdoor. We first measured
the level of interpersonal cultural diversity, or disagreement
among employees about the norms and beliefs characteriz-
ing the organization. We found that interpersonal cultural
diversity makes it difficult for employees to coordinate with
one another and reduces the organization’s efficiency as
measured by return on assets.

We then measured the organizations’ level of intra-
personal cultural diversity. Those with high intrapersonal
cultural diversity had employees with a large number of cul-
tural ideas and beliefs about how to accomplish tasks within
the company (measured as the average number of cultural
topics that employees discussed in their Glassdoor reviews).
For instance, employees at Netflix conceptualized the work
culture in terms of autonomy, responsibility, collaboration,
and intense internal competition. We found that organiza-
tions with greater intrapersonal cultural diversity had higher
market valuations and produced more and higher-quality
intellectual property via patenting, evidence that their

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employees’ diverse ideas about how to do work led them to
be more creative and innovative.

This suggests that organizations may be able to resolve
the assumed trade-off between efficiency and innovation by
encouraging diverse cultural ideas while fostering agreement
among employees about the importance of a common set of
organizational norms and beliefs. Again, consider Netflix:
Although “multicultural” employees contributed to the
company’s diverse culture and drove innovation, the culture
was nonetheless anchored by core shared beliefs, such as
the importance of radical transparency and accountability,
which help employees coordinate and work efficiently.

I M P L I C AT I O N S F O R P R A C T I C E
How can these findings inform leaders’ understanding of
culture as a tool for improving the performance of employ-
ees, teams, and the broader organization?

First, managers can increase retention by hiring can-
didates whose core values and beliefs about a desirable

workplace align well with those of current employees.
However, too much emphasis on cultural fit can stifle diver-
sity and cause managers to overlook promising candidates
with unique perspectives. Hiring managers should look for
candidates who demonstrate cultural adaptability, as these
employees may be better able to adjust to the inevitable
cultural changes that occur as organizations navigate increas-
ingly dynamic markets and an evolving workforce.

Hiring managers should also not overlook cultural misfits.
They can be wellsprings of creativity and innovation. But to
make sure they flourish inside the organization, managers
should consider assigning them to roles in which they are
likely to develop strong connections within particular social
groups. That’s because misfits need the trust and support
of colleagues to be seen as quirky innovators rather than
outlandish outsiders.

Second, leaders should be mindful that the expression of
diverse perspectives in teams needs to be managed. Cognitive
diversity is essential for generating novel, innovative solutions
to complex problems, especially during the planning and ide-
ation phases of a project. However, the expression of diverse

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perspectives can quickly become a liability when the team
needs to focus on execution and meet looming deadlines.
It is during these times that team members have to unify
around a common interpretation of the problem and come to
agreement about what needs to get done to solve it. Leaders
must be adept at switching back and forth, learning when and
how to promote the expression of divergent opinions and
meanings and when to create a context for convergence.

An important distinction is warranted here. The term
“diversity” is often used to connote variation in the demo-
graphic makeup of a firm’s workforce. This has been particu-
larly the case in recent years, as companies have tackled
pernicious problems such as the underrepresentation of
women and minorities in decision-making positions in
organizations. In our work, we use “cultural diversity” to
refer to variation in people’s beliefs and normative expecta-
tions, irrespective of their demographic composition. As we
pointed out earlier, demographic and cultural diversity are
related, but a demographically homogenous group may be
culturally diverse, and vice versa. Our research on cultural
diversity is relevant to but ultimately independent of efforts
to increase gender, race, and ethnic diversity in firms.

Third, leaders should foster a culture that is diverse yet
consensual in order to promote both innovation and effi-
ciency. Such a culture is composed of multicultural employ-
ees who each subscribe to a variety of norms and beliefs
about how to do work. These diverse ideas help employees
excel at complex tasks, such as dreaming up the next ground-
breaking innovation. Managers should encourage employees
to experiment with different ways of working—extensive
collaboration for some tasks, for example, and intense
competition for others. At the same time, a culture should
also be consensual in that employees agree on a common set
of cultural norms—shared understandings—that helps them
successfully coordinate with one another. Leaders can signal
the importance of these norms during onboarding and in
everyday interactions, just as leaders at Netflix do by reward-
ing employees for sharing their mistakes with colleagues in
order to promote beliefs about the value of transparency.

A N E W M A N A G E M E N T T O O L
Many of the tools we used in these studies are off-the-shelf
products, and there is great potential for managers to use
them to help solve practical challenges inside organizations.
For instance, Stanford PhD candidate Anjali Bhatt is working
with two of us to demonstrate how language-based culture
measures can be used to anticipate the pain points of post-
merger integration. We are studying the merger of three retail
banks, and analysis of emails has revealed stark differences

in the rates of cultural assimilation among individuals.
Such tools can be used diagnostically to assess the cultural
alignment between firms during premerger due diligence,
as well as prescriptively during integration to identify where
and how to focus managerial interventions.

Yet the accessibility of these tools also raises important
ethical concerns. In our work, we maintain strict employee
confidentiality, meaning that neither we nor the organization
is able to link any employee to any specific communication
used in our studies. We also strongly advise against using
these tools to select, reward, or punish individual employees
and teams, for at least four reasons: Accurately predicting
individual and team performance is considerably more
challenging than estimating average effects for broad types
of individuals and teams; culture is only one of many factors
influencing individual and team performance in organi-
zations; algorithmic predictions often create a false sense
of certainty in managers; and finally, giving any algorithm
undue weight can have unintended consequences—for
instance, exacerbating human biases that negatively affect
women and members of underrepresented social groups.

Algorithms make estimates, but it is ultimately humans’
responsibility to make informed judgments using them.
Managers must be vigilant about keeping metadata anony-
mous and must regularly audit algorithmic decision-making
for bias to ensure that the use of language-based tools does
not have unintended adverse consequences on culture
itself—for instance, by breeding employee distrust.

These important ethical questions notwithstanding, we
believe that these tools will continue to generate insights that
allow managers to finally manage the culture as a strategic
resource, and ultimately lead to more culturally diverse and
inclusive teams and organizations.

HBR Reprint R2001E

MATTHEW CORRITORE is an assistant professor of strategy and
organization at McGill’s Desautels Faculty of Management.

AMIR GOLDBERG is an associate professor of organizational behavior
at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. SAMEER B. SRIVASTAVA
is an associate professor and the Harold Furst Chair in Management
Philosophy and Values at the University of California, Berkeley’s
Haas School of Business. He and Goldberg codirect the Berkeley-
Stanford Computational Culture Lab.

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C U LT U R E

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Neutralizing A Negative Workplace:
Understanding and dealing with negativity at the
office
White, Paul . Personal Excellence Essentials ; Aurora (Apr 2018).

ProQuest document link

ABSTRACT (ENGLISH)
Negativity is one of the most common, and deeply ingrained, obstacles to a healthy work environment. When

working with front-line employees, supervisors and mid-level managers, a frequent question I hear is, “What can I

do to create more positive interactions in my workplace? People are so negative here!”

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Negativity is one of the most common, and deeply ingrained, obstacles to a healthy work environment. When

working with front-line employees, supervisors and mid-level managers, a frequent question I hear is, “What can I

do to create more positive interactions in my workplace? People are so negative here!”

Negativity: What is it, really?

Believe it or not, the term “negativity” does not mean the same thing to everyone or display itself consistently in all

work settings. Each facility, or even departments within a facility, can be “negative” in different ways. So the first

step is to behaviorally define: “What does ‘negativity’ look like in your work setting?”

In getting feedback from supervisors and employees, we came up with a long list of behaviors and characteristics.

Here is our current list.

Examples of Negative Behaviors in the Workplace

Where Negativity Comes From

Negative reactions are created by a variety of factors, and often a combination of issues. One of the most

frequently ignored set of factors are physiological ones. While it becomes obvious once mentioned, we need to

remember that we are more likely to react with negative behavior when we are tired, hungry or thirsty, if there are

hormonal changes occurring, or when we generally don’t feel well, have a headache, or in pain.

Probably the most common source of negative reactions is when expectations aren’t met. We get angry (at

different intensity levels) when what we think should happen doesn’t, or when something happens that we think

shouldn’t.

So, if a team member is (or a group of employees are) consistently displaying negative reactions in the workplace,

it is quite likely that they are experiencing a mismatch between their expectations and what they are experiencing

in day-to-day work life. Hundreds of books have been written on the topic of controlling our emotional reactions by

examining our thought patterns and belief systems which can be of help.

How to Begin to Neutralize Negativity

So what can be done? Do you just have to accept the level of negativity expressed in your workplace?

No, you don’t have to resort to “walking on eggshells” waiting for someone to explode, or try to avoid colleagues

who seem angry much of the time. Nor do you have to endure the seemingly endless complaining, grumbling and

cynical comments made by others.

“We do not have the power to change others’ attitudes, and often we have minimal ability to shape their behaviors.

But each of us has the capability to impact those we work with on a daily basis”. Here are three practical steps to

begin with:

1. Don’t engage in the negative. When others are complaining, keep quiet. If a group is gossiping about another

team member, just walk away. When someone acts in a hostile way toward you, respond appropriately and calmly.

Don’t add to the negative energy others are displaying.

2. Contribute to the positive. A positive comment is like throwing water on a fire trying to get started. Smile. Make

a humorous (non-cutting) comment. Tell someone thanks for a job done well. Comment on how nice the weather is

or being thankful for air conditioning. A little positivity and gratefulness can douse a developing “negativity”

wildfire.

3. Explore your and others’ expectations and compare them with reality. Examine whether people’s expectations

are reality-based. (Tip: It is best to start with yourself rather than others.) Compare your situation with other

situations worse than yours, and see how that impacts your perspective. Consider doing some in-service training

with staff on what are realistic and unrealistic expectations for their jobs and workplace.

Unfortunately, negative attitudes and behaviors seem to reign in many workplaces. But don’t let others dominate

and take control of your workplace environment. Each person can begin to take steps to help create a more

positive workplace, and when employees work together to do so, a far healthier workplace culture can be

developed.

Author Bio

Dr. Paul White is the author of The Vibrant Workplace and co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the

Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman, author of the NY Times #1 Bestseller, The 5 Love Languages.

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Subject: Employees

Business indexing term: Subject: Employees

People: Chapman, Gary

Publication title: Personal Excellence Essentials; Aurora

Publication year: 2018

Publication date: Apr 2018

Publisher: HR.COM

Place of publication: Aurora

Country of publication: Canada, Aurora

Publication subject: Sociology

Source type: Magazine

Language of publication: English

Document type: Feature

Publication history :

Online publication date: 2018-04-08

Publication history :

   First posting date: 08 Apr 2018

ProQuest document ID: 2043346287

Document URL: https://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2F

magazines%2Fneutralizing-negative-workplace-

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Copyright: Copyright HR.COM Apr 2018

Last updated: 2020-11-18

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  • Neutralizing A Negative Workplace: Understanding and dealing with negativity at the office