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 Create a “yearbook” presentation of psychological concepts and theories throughout history, past and present findings. For each course outcome, choose at least one time period to research about the significant findings that happened during the time. For example, for Course Outcome #1, you could choose to research the 1900s and the work of Sigmund Freud and the early 2000s for more recent research findings related to psychodynamic therapy and defense mechanisms. Include information about the major figure or figures of the time, where applicable. Make clear connections to key concepts and theories related to each course outcome using scholarly sources and relevant images.

Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity:

· Textbook

· Lessons

· Minimum of 3 outside scholarly sources

Instructions Create a “yearbook” presentation of psychological concepts and theories throughout history, past and present findings. For each course outcome, choose at least one time period to research about the significant findings that happened during the time. For example, for Course Outcome #1, you could choose to research the 1900s and the work of Sigmund Freud and the early 2000s for more recent research findings related to psychodynamic therapy and defense mechanisms. Include information about the major figure or figures of the time, where applicable. Make clear connections to key concepts and theories related to each course outcome using scholarly sources and relevant images.

Following is a list of the 7 course outcomes you will need to address in your presentation.

Course Outcomes

1. Assess theoretical perspectives related to human behavior, including physiological explanations for changes in behavior.

2. Analyze the processes of sensation and perception, and the factors that affect consciousness.

3.  Examine the physiological and psychological impact of stress, and various techniques for stress management.

4. Illustrate models of learning and memory.

5. Analyze key theories on motivation and personality.

6. Describe the major physical, cognitive, and social developmental changes that occur from infancy to adulthood.

7. Describe different types of psychological disorders, schools of thought on possible causes, and how society responds to people living with mental disorders.

And here is a sample of the type of information you will need to include in your presentation:  Sample Slides  Download Sample Slides

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Presentation Requirements (APA format)

· Length: 14-21 slides (not including title, introduction, and references slides)

· Font should not be smaller than size 16-point

· Parenthetical in-text citations included and formatted in APA style

· References slide (a minimum of 3 outside scholarly sources plus the textbook and/or the weekly lesson for each course outcome)

· Title and introduction slide required

Grading                                                    This activity will be graded based on the Project Grading Rubric.

Course Outcomes (CO): 1-7

Due Date: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Saturday

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Psychology Yearbook

Student Name

PSYC110 Final Project

Date

1900s: Psychoanalysis

Course Outcome #1: Assess theoretical perspectives related to human behavior, including physiological explanations for changes in behavior

Sigmund Freud was an Austrian physician in the early 1900s, who believed that our behavior could be explained by the unconscious mind (Feldman, 2019)

Freud proposed that we repressed our urges and desires and they try to make their way to the surface causing disorders

Freud emphasized the importance of early childhood experiences

Key concepts related to psychoanalysis include: transference, dream interpretation, transference, resistance and defense mechanisms

2000s: Psychodynamic Perspective

The modern perspective of psychoanalysis

The focus is on the development of an individual’s sense of self

The discovery of motivations behind a person’s behavior is more important than sexual motivations, which was more of a focus of psychoanalysis

2000s: Psychodynamic Perspective

Today, psychodynamic therapy is still used to treat certain psychological disorders

Research suggests that psychodynamic therapy can be effective for personality disorders, but more research on the effectiveness of specific psychodynamic therapy for specific personality disorders needs to be conducted (Leichsenring & Leibing, 2003).

According to Cramer (2000), cognitive psychologists have confirmed the existence of unconscious psychological processes.

Developmental, personality, and social psychologists have also found evidence for defense mechanisms that can explain psychological functioning (Cramer, 2000).

References

Cramer, P. (2000). Defense mechanisms in psychology today: Further processes for adaptation. American Psychologist, 55(6), 637.

Feldman, R. (2019). Understanding Psychology (14th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education.

Leichsenring, F., & Leibing, E. (2003). The effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of personality disorders: a meta-analysis. American journal of psychiatry, 160(7), 1223-1232. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.160.7.1223

[Untitled online image of Sigmund Freud]. Retrieved February 25, 2019 from https://www.forbes.com/sites/phildemuth/2014/09/08/are-you-suffering-from-post-great-recession-stress-disorder/#7f7aa3622769

References

[Untitled online image of “what motivates you?”]. Retrieved February 25, 2019 from http://www.michaelmurphyand.com/mistaking-perks-for-a-winning-company-culture/

[Untitled online image of child smiling and folding arms]. Retrieved February 25, 2019 from https://www.webpsychology.com/news/2016/01/06/giving-children-strong-sense-self-bolsters-resillience-later-life-250821

[Untitled online image of therapy session]. Retrieved February 25, 2019 from https://library.neura.edu.au/browse-library/treatments/psychosocial/psychodynamic-psychotherapy/

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Psychological Perspectives Comparison

Key People/Theorists

Main Ideas

Strengths

Weaknesses

Cognitive Perspective

Plato and Descartes

Ulric Neisser was the father of cognitive psychology.

how people think, understand, and know about the world

1. It offers a lot of practical applications

2. Effective in treating anxiety

3. Based off actual experiments

1. It does not allow for direct observation

2. Not effective for all individuals

3. It overlooks other behavioral factors.

Behavioral Perspective

Ivan Pavlov, Edward Thorndike, John B. Watson, and B.F. Skinner

External behavior that can be measured or observed

1. Useful applications in therapy, education, parenting, and childcare

2. Scientific and replicable

3. Useful for modifying behavior in the real- world

1. Environmental determinism

2. Does not consider moods, thoughts, or feelings

3. Does not explain all learning

Psychodynamic Perspective

Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, and Alfred Adler

Focuses on the unconscious and the importance of childhood experiences

1. Focuses on the effects of childhood experiences have on personality

2. It takes both nature and nurture into account

1. Unfalsifiable- the assumptions cannot be scientifically measured or proved wrong

2. Deterministic- it suggests that behavior is pre-determined, and people do not have free will

Humanistic Perspective

Focused on uniquely human issues, such as the self, self-actualization, health, hope, love, creativity, nature, being, becoming, and individuality

Concrete understanding of human existence

1. It emphasizes individual choice and responsibility

2. Satisfies the idea of most people

1. Promotes frustration among clients

2. Experience is required

Neuroscience Perspective

Franz Gall, Phineas Gage, Roger Sperry, Ronald Myers, and Michael Gazzaniga

Phillip Vogel and Joseph Bogen

The study of the nervous system, especially the brain

Based on activities of the neural and structural changes or alterations in the brain

1. Examines the effects of the brain damage or behavior

2. Record brain activity during behavior

1. Social pressure, environmental contributions, childhood experiences, and cultural variables