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In this post you have a choice.  You are either going to explore SPACE or TIME.  If you choose to explore a spatial topic, you will make a digital map.  If you choose to explore a chronological topic, you will create a digital timeline. 

The topic can be anything appropriate covered by THIS COURSE.  But I do encourage you to Message me in advance with your topic to make sure it will work well.    Some events don't have a clear spatial component or clear chronological cause and effect.

Digital Mapping Instructions

This assignment asks you to create a map on a unified topic. As with the Time Travel, you have

a lot of choice in what you pick! The topic can be anything discussed through the entire course

but it has to have a spatial diminution. In other words, SPACE and PLACE have to matter.

There has to be a reason why things happened where they did. Here are a few examples of

topics done by previous students (with the class in parentheses):

• The Battles of Alexander the Great (101)

• Viking invasions (101)

• The Crusades (101)

• Plantations in the US South (111)

• Growth of Cities in Early America (111)

• The Scramble for Africa (102)

• American Imperialism (112)

• Important battles in WWI or WWII (102, 112)

• Civil Rights protests (102, 112)

The sort of topics you don’t really see there are intellectual and social history. Did it matter

WHERE Isaac Newton was when he wrote the Principia Mathematica? Probably not to the extent

that it mattered WHERE the Crusades occurred! Sometimes you can show a geographic pattern

in art, literature, or science, but it will be much easier to do when people are exploiting or

developing physical resources or fighting over territory!

If you aren’t sure if your topic will work, come to Chat or send me a BB message and

we can discuss it!

In Blackboard you will ALSO find a handout showing you how to use the digital mapping tool.

This may be Heganoo, Scribble Maps, or another site. There will also be video instructions to

help you quickly learn the tool.

No matter what tool we use, your MAP should contain:

• YOUR NAME included in the title of the map to show that it is your creation.

• Five separate locations (more is OK but not required).

• EACH location must have:

o A short description (2-3 sentences) for the location, explaining what it is, why its

location/geography matters, and its significance to your map story.

o An embedded picture or video OR link to a primary source of or relevant to the

location. It’s a very good idea to make sure your images are open source. See the

Scribble Maps instructions for how to search for reusable images.

o A link to the reference page where you learned about the site. You do not need a

formal bibliography! Just a link! But your site should be reliable and scholarly.

• If you picture comes from a different site, a link to its original site should be provided.

But since YouTube videos contain the option to watch them on Youtube, you don’t need to

provide a link for a video.

Your POST should contain:

• A share link to your map (make sure you share it and use this link!).

• A ¾-1 page (double spaced) description/analysis of the story your map is telling – i.e.

what should we learn by looking through all the locations, and why it’s spatial (why things

happened WHERE they did).

• No replies are necessary but they earn Classcraft XP (20 each)

Length: Mapping posts should be about ¾ to 1 page long in Word. The real emphasis is on the

map you create. Remember to always type into Word so that that you don’t lose your work if

Blackboard crashes. Upload ALL post Word documents to SafeAssign all at the same time at the

end of the Unit.

Mapping Post Checklist

 You created a digital map using one of the provided tools that has a unified, spatial topic and it contains at least five

(5) locations: 5 pts

 Each location has a 2-3 sentence description with no typos AND a picture or video or link to a reliable primary source.

It also contains a reference link. 10 pts.

 Your post includes a ¾ to 1 page analysis of your map (what you hope we will learn from exploring it and what makes

it “spatial”) as well as the link to it: 5 pts

 Replies are optional but are worth 20 Classcraft XP each.

Mapping Rubric

Examples

The War of 1812 lasted from 1812 to 1815, the war sadly revealed that the U.S. armed forces

were ill prepared. However, the most important outcome of the war was that it declared

American independence and guaranteed no future battles with Britain over trade or territory. The

invasion of Canada resulted in the British controlling half of the Old Northwest by the winter of

1812-1813. The British Blockade hit American trade hard but at the Battle of Put-In-Bay the

Americans gained control of Lake Erie. Erie was important to control because of trade and access

to ports. Sadly, next the naval troops set the White House to flames burning down the Capital.

My favorite part of my map story is the Battle of Baltimore and how the Americans won. The

Battle took place in the Harbor which is one of my favorite places to go in Baltimore always has

been since my Aunts took me on Taxi boat. Also, because even though my city isn't the best city

out there I love Baltimore! This harbor was also important to control because of trade. If you

can stop a country from getting products in and out, then you will win the war. I learned that

coasts, rivers, and lakes are geographically important goals to control in any war because of this

reason.

https://www.heganoo.com/node/26025

My map is on Plantations in the South before the Civil War. You can see that all of these were

large plantations and the owners very rich. They got rich on the backs of their slaves, who

farmed and processed the cotton, rice, sugar, tobacco, and other crops. Plantations had to be

located where these cash crops would grow, which meant the south where it was warm enough

for things like cotton to thrive. And most were near a river or later, a railroad. Railroads meant

that plantations could expand beyond rivers and owners could still get their crops to market.

Being near a big city wasn’t important, but you had to have some form of transportation. In

fact, being isolated from big towns would make it harder for slaves to communicate, plan

rebellions, or run away. My map shows the impact of these plantations by giving the number of

lives that were enslaved at each. They may look beautiful but they contained a lot of suffering.

https://www.heganoo.com/node/20497 (this student has several more locations than needed!)

And here is an example of a Scribble Map. This is not one that a student created but one I

quickly put together, so you could see what one of these looks like:

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Scribble Maps Instructions

Go to scribblemaps.com to get started. Begin by making a FREE account. You do not need the

pay version, not even a free trial of the pay version. You don’t absolutely need an account, but

it’s much easier to get back to your map to edit it if you take a minute to make one. I’ve never

gotten spam from having an account with

them.

The link for making an account (or logging in

once you have one) is in the top right of the

home page:

Note: If you don’t make an account, you MUST

save the “edit” link for your map to a text file

on your computer to be able to get back to it!!!

Scribblemaps is pretty intuitive, but you can find help on pretty much any topic here:

http://help.scribblemaps.com/

They also have a channel of Youtube videos: https://www.youtube.com/scribblemaps

On their list of Youtube videos, you’ll probably want to watch “Getting started with your first

map: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0lZPurKzRg”

Then watch this “Free Tech For Teachers” video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7UU4utCqXs which will show you how to add placemarks

to your map.

Please use BASIC icons for adding placemarks, like the paddles or numbers! Numbers

are the best choice because that makes sure the person viewing your map sees ALL of them!

You don’t want your viewers (especially your professor who is grading you on the number of

placemarks) to miss one.

Once you add a placemark, you need to edit it to add information about the location and tell

your map’s story.

As you saw in the “Free Tech for Teachers” video, you can use the buttons in the edit window to add a link (i.e. to your references),

a YouTube video, an image, or even a SoundCloud recording.

You should use free-for-reuse images (see below)!

But I actually suggest that you click on “Advanced Editing.” Then you will see this:

Save your map frequently! I suggest checking the “autosave” feature as shown in the “Your

First Map” video!

The parameters of this assignment are the SAME as for when we use Heganoo – I will

still be looking for 5+ placemarks, each with 2-3 sentences of information, a reference

for that information, and multimedia (embedded picture, video, or a link to a related

primary source).

But if appropriate, this tool ALSO allows you to draw on the map using the drawing tools, which

Heganoo does not. This isn’t always something you want to do. But if you are making a map of

the American Colonies, maybe you want to draw on the Proclamation line. Or if you are doing

World War II, maybe you want to add arrows indicating where the Germans advanced in

Operation Barbarosa. Or lines indicating the routes crusaders took during the First Crusade in

History 101. While you should not use the “ABC” button for adding Placemarks (because it’s text

only), if you do draw on your map, you can use it to label your drawn lines!

If appropriate, lines drawn on the map and labeled so that their purpose is clear count

as the equivalent of one use of multimedia.

Once you are done with your map, you want to save it again to get the “Share” link. That link is

what you include in your post on Blackboard:

Note that this isn’t the Facebook link, just the regular Share link that lets anyone view (but not

edit) your map. NOTE: When you FIRST save your map, make sure you do select a simple

password, so you can edit it in the future! Make sure it’s one you can remember! And if

you did not make an account, you MUST save the Edit link to your computer as well or

you will never be able to get back to your map if you need to change it!!!!!!

Editing an existing Scribble Map

Log in to your Scribble Maps page if you made an account (if you didn’t, the only way to get to

your map is if you saved the “Edit” link). It should take you directly to the “Create a Map” page,

but if not, click on that link in the upper right of the Scribble Maps page.

Then click on the MENU button on the tool bar. The Tool Bar is at the upper left of your map. In

the image below, the MENU button is highlighted yellow:

From the pop-up menu, select “Your Maps.” The image below shows this pop-up window and

“Your Maps” is highlighted yellow:

Select the map you want to edit.

Now you can add new placemarks, draw on your map, and so on.

To EDIT an existing location, make sure you have selected the Edit/Measure tool (the cursor

arrow with a plus-sign next to it).

Then click on any of your existing placemarks and you’ll see a pencil icon at the upper left corner

of the placemark description. Click that pencil to edit!

Make sure to save your map when you are done!

One last note on finding images that you have the right to use. You should always

respect copyright and it’s actually easy to search for open-source images. Just go to

https://images.google.com and enter your search terms. On the next page, click “Tools.” Then

click “Usage Rights.”

Then select “Non-commercial Reuse” from the Usage Rights drop-down menu. This will ensure

your search only brings up images you can reuse for non-profit purposes such as this

assignment!

This isn’t as important with the Youtube videos, because your viewers will always be able to click

on the “Youtube” icon at the bottom right of the screen to view it in the original context.

And if the creator of the YouTube video doesn’t want you to embed it, they will set the video so

that’s not allowed. But that means you should ALWAYS check your video links to make

sure they play! If you get a notice that it can only be viewed on YouTube, you know that’s

because you aren’t allowed to embed it!

It’s also good to check that the person or group who posted the video are the ones that created

it! For example, Crash Course videos should always be posted by Crash Course and you should

see this logo under the video:

,

Digital Timeline Instructions

This assignment asks you to create a timeline of a unified topic. As with the Day-in-the-life or

Digital Map assignments, you have a lot of choice in what you pick! The topic can be anything

discussed through the entire course but it has to tell a unified story in time with cause and

effect. In other words, TIME has matter. There has to be a reason why things happened when

they did. Here are a few examples of topics done by previous students (with the class in

parentheses):

• The rise and fall of Alexander’s empire

(101)

• Evolution of the Roman Republic and

Empire (101)

• The Crusades (101)

• The American Revolution (111)

• Westward expansion (111 and 112)

• Spread of a plague or disease like the

Plague of Athens, Black Death, or Spanish

flu (all courses).

• Spread of scientific ideas (102)

• American Imperialism (112)

• A campaign in WWI or WWII (102, 112)

• The evolution of the Civil Rights

Movement/Legislation (102, 112)

The sort of topics you don’t really see there are stories where a lot of things happen

independently. You need cause and effect. For example, something that would NOT work is a

list of rulers in Europe. You could make a timeline with several rulers, giving information about

each. But unless there was cause and effect (one ruler caused another one to take power), this

would NOT be a good topic. Make sure your story has an “X caused Y which caused Z” narrative.

If you aren’t sure if your topic will work, come to Chat or send me a BB message and

we can discuss it!

In Blackboard you will ALSO find a handout showing you how to use the digital timeline tool.

This may be Sutori or another site. Make sure to read that “How to” handout!

No matter what tool we use, your TIMELINE should contain:

• YOUR NAME included in the title to show that it is your creation.

• At least 2 headers (the event/short term consequences, then the long term

consequences). You may wish to sub-divide your story more, which is fine.

• 10 separate items not counting the headers (more is OK but not required). Since

each step requires 2 items, that’s really 5 steps in your timeline.

• EACH step in the event you are explaining must have these things:

o A text item with the DATE and a short description (2-3 sentences) for each step in

the event, explaining what it is, how it was caused by previous events (unless it’s

the first one), and its significance to your timeline story.

o A multi-media item with embedded picture, video, or map **OR** link to a

primary source of or relevant to the location. It’s a very good idea to make sure

your images are open source. See the “How to Use Sutori” instructions for how to

search for reusable images.

Citing:

• There is an area at the end of the timeline for your sources. You will need a citation to

the reference page where you learned about each of the 5 text items in your sources at

the end of the presentation. Your reference sites should be reliable and scholarly. Your

textbook does not count as a source – you need to dig deeper!

• If you use a picture, a link to its original site should also be provided in the references

section. But since YouTube videos contain the option to watch them on Youtube, you

don’t need to provide a link/citation for a video.

Your POST should contain:

• A share link or embedded code to your timeline (make sure you test this link!).

• A ¾-1 page (double spaced) description/analysis of the story your timeline is telling – i.e.

what should we learn by looking through all the locations, and why it’s temporal (why

things happened WHEN they did).

• No replies are necessary but they earn Classcraft XP (20 each)

Length: Timeline posts should be about ¾ to 1 page long in Word. The real emphasis is on the

timeline you create. Remember to always type into Word so that that you don’t lose your work

if Blackboard crashes. Upload ALL post Word documents to SafeAssign all at the same time at

the end of the Unit.

Timeline Post Checklist

 You created a digital timeline using one of the provided tools that has a unified, temporal topic and it contains at

least five (5) steps with 2 items – one text and one multimedia — each for ten (10) total things on the timeline not

counting the headers. The timeline contains your real name or chosen pseudonym. 5 pts

 Each of the 5 steps has a text item with 2-3 sentence description with no typos AND a multimedia item (a picture,

video, map, or link to a reliable primary source. Your bibliography contains references for the sites where you learned

about the events and credits for any uploaded pictures. 12 pts.

 Your post includes a ¾ to 1 page analysis of your timeline (what you hope we will learn from exploring it and what

makes it “spatial”) as well as the link to it: 8 pts

 Replies are optional but are worth 20 Classcraft XP each.

Timeline Rubric

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How to use Sutori to Create a Timeline

Begin by planning out your timeline. What topic will you explore? What are the cause-and-

effect steps you will explain? How many major “chapters” or “sections” will your timeline have

(for example, a “Before the Main Event” section, a Main Event section, and a “Long Term

Consequences” section.

Start by going to https://www.sutori.com/. Click on the “Sign

Up” button in the upper right corner and create a free account. While you are signing up for a free account, you will get the features of a paid account for 30 days.

Once you have an account, go to https://help.sutori.com/en/ to

learn about the tool. In particular, read the articles in the “Create and Share” section of the help page:

Once you have read about how to create a timeline, go to your account page by clicking on your

profile icon at the top right of the page. Then go to your Stories tab at the top center of the

page.

Click the “Create Story” icon. Use a blank template, not one of the provided ones.

**Important** Your timeline MUST include your real name or your chosen pseudonym for you

to receive credit for this assignment!

Then write an introduction to your timeline, explaining the topic you will explore and add your

first “Chapter,” which should be the preliminary events that set the stage. Then hover your

cursor over the central blue line to add events to that chapter (and later to start a new chapter)

Keep adding items! You need 5 events with 2 items each (one text, one multimedia – image,

video, or audio). You can ALSO add quiz questions in addition if you wish. Please don’t add

forums. This total does not include the headers.

Make sure you add a caption for all your embedded media. You do this just by clicking in the

box. The space for adding your caption will appear:

See the next page for an example. Once you have added all your items, go to the very bottom

of your timeline. There you will see an area to add your conclusions and your references. Click

on the words “Add Conclusions and Sources” to add your conclusions and sources!

Here is an example showing two events, each with a text item and a multimedia item. First

there is a description of the Mongol expansion with an embedded Crash Course video. Then

there is an explanation of how plague reached Europe because of this, with an uploaded (open

source) map image.

One last note on finding images that you have the right to use. You should always

respect copyright and it’s actually easy to search for open-source images. Just go to

https://images.google.com and enter your search terms. On the next page, click “Tools.” Then

click “Usage Rights.”

Then select “Non-commercial Reuse” from the Usage Rights drop-down menu. This will ensure

your search only brings up images you can reuse for non-profit purposes such as this

assignment!

This isn’t as important with the Youtube videos, because your viewers will always be able to click

on the “Youtube” icon at the bottom right of the screen to view it in the original context.

And if the creator of the YouTube video doesn’t want you to embed it, they will set the video so

that’s not allowed. But that means you should ALWAYS check your video links to make

sure they play! If you get a notice that it can only be viewed on YouTube, you know that’s

because you aren’t allowed to embed it!

It’s also good to check that the person or group who posted the video are the ones that created

it! For example, Crash Course videos should always be posted by Crash Course and you should

see this logo under the video: