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Please read chapters 22 and 23 attached

Presenting your research findings and presenting your research results.

What are some suggestions that you would like to share regarding disseminating your research findings? How would you present them for presentation or defense? Additionally, discuss the rationale and responsibilities for publication of your research.

Looking forward to some great information.

Chapter 22 Presenting Your Research Findings

Chapter 23 Publishing Your Research Results

Nursing Research NGR 6812

Florida National University

Chapter 22
Presenting Your Research Findings

Selecting a Conference

Poster Presentations

Podium Presentations

Summary

Selecting a Conference

There are many local, regional, and national research conferences from which to select.

Cohen, Greco, & Martin, 2013 suggests aligning your talents with audience, location, timing and opportunity.

Audience: Are these the people who would be interested in the results of my study? Are they the people I want to reach?

Location: The cost of travel may affect your selection.

Timing: Will I be free to travel on the dates of the conference?

Opportunity: Does this conference provide opportunities to meet colleagues with mutual interests?

Poster Presentations

Poster Presentations allow you the publishers to engage and disseminate your evidence among your peer set.

It is essential to be able to defend your research as you may encounter some challenging questions.

Ensure that your information in organized for presentation.

This is like your research paper: Title, Introduction, Method, Results, Analysis, and Discussion.

Consider customizing your completed document with graphics as the old saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words.

Podium Presentations

Organizing the Information

Adding Graphics

Speaking

When the Audience Is Also the Population of Interest

Conclusions

The conversations that occur with poster and podium presentations are a very valuable and energizing exchange of information among scientists with similar interests. They are not, however, a substitute for publishing your findings. Publication reaches a wider audience and provides a more permanent record of your work.

Chapter 23
Publishing Your Research Results

Nursing Research NGR 6812

Florida National University

Contents

Reporting to Funders

Reporting to the Public

Publishing in Professional Journals

Research Letters and Brief Reports

Special Considerations for Qualitative Research

After Publication

Conclusion

Reporting to Funders

Reporting to your funder is an obligation if you have received financial support for your study.

Funders usually want two types of information: how their money was spent and what was accomplished.

Each funder will have a different reporting format that you should follow as closely as you can in preparing your reports.

Sometimes funders also want to be involved in releasing the results to the public, a request that should be respected.

Reporting to the Public

You will have to “translate” your findings from technical language into language a layperson can understand.

Remember that knowledge is cumulative. Your study results need to be connected to what is already known.

Remember also that it is rare for a single study to be definitive.

Results need to be replicated, that is, to be confirmed in other studies before they are used to change practice.

When you speak with reporters, you may not have the final say on how the results are written up and made known to the public.

Misquotes can distort your results, so be sure you are very clear in describing your results and in explaining what the results mean.

Some publishers will let you review a draft of what will be in print; others will not.

Going directly to the public bypasses peer review (not recommended in academia), that important source of critique that provides an objective evaluation of the credibility of your study results and their importance to health care.

Publishing in Professional Journals

Select a target journal. Some points to consider in making this important decision.

Download the information for authors from the journal you selected.

Assemble your related articles, references, data output, original proposal, and other materials related to the subject of the article.

Reread them if you need to refresh your memory before creating the outline.

Outline the article (Just as you would your research paper).

Publishing in Professional Journals

Make

Next, make notes about the key points under each item of the outline.

Write

Write the narrative for each section of the outline using your notes regarding the key points but now filling in the details.

Read

Read the manuscript from beginning to end. Revise and rewrite where needed.

Ask

Ask a colleague to review and critique the manuscript or set it aside for several days to get some distance from it, and then review it as if it were someone else’s manuscript.

Recheck

Recheck the formatting, limits on length, and other requirements in the instructions to authors to be sure you have followed their directions.

Submit

Submit the manuscript with a brief cover letter to the editor, signatures, and any statements regarding authorship and exclusive submission for that journal as required by the journal.

Publishing in Professional Journals

Keep track of the article online as it moves through the review process.

If you receive a request for revisions, make each of them carefully, and list them in a letter to the editor. (Remember, this letter may be sent to the previous reviewers or a new set of reviewers.) If a change is requested that you are not able to make, respectfully explain why you cannot.

If the article is rejected, analyze why this happened, taking careful note of whatever reasons were given by the editor. Discuss your next steps (revising and resubmitting to another journal) with colleagues and mentors before proceeding. Do not abandon the manuscript.

When you receive the acceptance of your article, celebrate. This is an achievement to be proud of.

Research Letters and Brief Reports

When you have only pilot work or data from a relatively small sample, but the results are new (no one else has reported similar results) or ground-breaking (suggesting an entirely new approach or perspective, for example), you may consider submission of a research letter or brief report.

Check the appropriate journals for author information to see if they accept these brief manuscripts.

Special Considerations for Qualitative Research

Introduce your study with a clear research question and use it to guide your writing of the entire article.

Connect your study with what is already known by citing the existing literature.

“Show your work” as in math class. Describe how you followed the recommended procedures of one of the qualitative approaches to analysis (Reay, 2014, p. 98).

Tell an intriguing and convincing story of your results and how they relate to what is already known.

Tell the reader how your findings contribute to existing knowledge (Reay, 2014).

After Publication

Write a clinical article for journals read by practicing nurses.

Contribute to publications of our national organizations including the specialty organization that would be most interested in your work.

Speak to groups of practicing nurses at local, regional, and national meetings.

Start or join an existing blog for nurses with interest in your topic.

Post information about your work on relevant websites.

Conclusion

Sharing the results of your research with others is part of your responsibility as a nurse researcher. Practitioners need to know the results of your research if they are going to make their practice as evidence based as possible.

Consider a different perspective on the importance of publishing the findings of your research that may motivate you to get your findings published: It would be selfish not to share what you learned, wouldn’t it?

References

Reay, T. (2014). Publishing qualitative research. Family Business Review, 27(2), 95–102.

Tappen, R. M. (2015). Advanced Nursing Research. [VitalSource Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781284132496/

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