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project assignment so I only need to focus on three parts:

  

“Commons”:  Commons refers to areas or establishments in which people gather, socialize, spend leisure time, or use for recreation (e.g. walking, biking, and walking their dogs).  What are the most popular neighborhood hangouts and what subgroup(s) of the population are drawn to those particular places to hang out? Supportive data may include:

· The “closed” hang out places that may be unfriendly to strangers or newcomers? 

· Is there any gang activity?

· Popular bars or nightlife?

· Places that draw younger people (Jr. High, high school)?

  

Transportation: Include photos of cars, buses, trains, ferries, trolleys, bicycles, and pedestrians.  Photos of people utilizing the various types of transportation would be appropriate for your windshield survey.  Noting the safety measures (bike lanes, safe crosswalks, etc.) is helpful.   Which type(s) of transportation seems to be the most predominant in the community?  

· Is the public transportation accessible and provide good transportation options for community residents?

· Where is the closest/local airport?

· What are the major highways that are close to the area?

  

Health Status of the Community: Evaluate the vital health statistics for the area. For example, note what mortality rates are. And morbidity rates for chronic conditions in particular.  Is there a specific health problem with a high incidence/prevalence rate in the community or a health problem within the community related to the environment (e.g. a problem of air pollution and high community rates of respiratory infection)? Is there high risk of non -communicable disease (e.g. Lead exposure)? Are there high risks of communicable diseases? (e.g. Tuberculosis; Covid-19) 

For health status of the community, I did not find major information but I uploaded a file that is out to date, but can use page 40 to 42 of the little village quality of life pdf to guide in the research. Please write everything with supportive data 

I uploaded some picture and major information for that assignment

Community Assessment & Analysis

“Windshield Survey”

Purpose and Background Information

Nurses must be able to knowledgeably plan services for individuals, families and the community. In order to effectively plan, it is essential that you assess the current health status of the community and its resources.

Assessment may include the following strategies: Mining of health data bases, windshield or walking surveys, and more formal quantitative and qualitative research investigations involving community members and other stakeholders. A “windshield survey” is conducted from a car and provides a visual overview of a community (may also be done as a walking survey). Conditions and trends in the community that could affect the health of the population (social determinants) are noted. Most surveys of this type must be validated and expanded through data mining of available online and other databases of demographic and health-related statistics.

Evidence collected during a formal community assessment forms the basis for planning to improve the health status of the community, which impacts individuals’ health downstream.

Objectives:

At the end of this activity, the student will be able to:

1. Identify social determinants of health present in assigned community (socioeconomic status, education, neighborhood and physical environment, employment, social support networks).

2. Identify healthcare resources that are available in the community.

3. Analyze actual health of the assigned community, utilizing resources to gather vital statistics, such as morbidity and mortality data.

4. Create a list of strengths and weaknesses of the community.

5. Prioritize weaknesses to identify the highest priority need of the community.

6. Identify community resources (actual, available resources or proposed resources) to address the highest priority problem.

7. Share community assessment and analysis in a formal, group presentation.

Course Outcomes

This activity aligns with several of the course outcomes as stated below:

1. Examine health delivery systems and resources available at the global, national, state, and local levels.

2. Examine effective methods for health promotion and health maintenance for individuals, families, and communities at every stage of development.

3. Analyze the environmental, biological, and psychosocial risk factors for disease and disability.

General Directions

Working in a small team, you will conduct a formal assessment of a community to which you have been assigned. The assessment will involve a walking or windshield survey which is validated and expanded upon through a deeper dive into demographic and health-related databases/websites available here:

https://researchguides.uic.edu/c.php?g=252323&p=1683295

Items Needed

· Digital camera/phone

· Map or layout of the neighborhood/community

· Mode of transportation (not needed if conducting walking survey)

· Masks if unable to practice social distancing


Part 1: Assessment

1. Your clinical group will be assigned a neighborhood to survey.

2. Review the Windshield Survey Components handout and PowerPoint (see Brightspace Lecture PPTS).

3. Review Community Tool Box resources for Windshield Survey:

https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/assessment/assessing-community-needs-and-resources/windshield-walking-surveys/main

4. Use Google Maps (or other navigation software) to identify boundaries of assigned area.

5. Collect assessment data on essential demographic and other aspects of the community using the guidelines below: [Support your assessment data with actual images/videos taken with your camera or available online]

The essential components of the Community Assessment are listed below:   


Race and Ethnicity:
Data and/or a description of the community demographics for the community. Be sure to identify any specific data that helps support the existence of your identified health problem or that may impact your health promotion project. Evaluate the racial identity of the community (e.g. is the area well integrated?) Consider the following questions. Are there indices of ethnicity, various types of ethnic food stores, ethnic churches, private schools related to ethnicity, signs and information in a language other than English?


Culture

: Analyze the cultural data and assess the cultural dynamics within the community that influence the community’s health beliefs or health status. 


Religion

:  Include the various types of churches and places of worship.  It would be beneficial to learn the number of available churches in the area, all of the different denominations and representation of differing religions, and the number of churches in a ratio comparison to the number of people in the community.


Politics

:  Determine if the community is very swayed politically or is predominantly of one party affiliation.  Identify evidence of political activism, such as campaign signs, political billboards, or other evidence of political influence.


Boundaries:
  You may include the street boundaries for the community, as well as any physical demarcation that defines the community boundaries:

· Is it a natural boundary such as a river or a lake?

· Is it a man-made boundary such as train tracks?

· Is there a noticeable difference in the socioeconomic level in comparison to neighboring communities?  Do the individual neighborhoods vary in socioeconomic status?


Housing and zoning:
  You may want to evaluate the typical single family, multi-family, alternative housing, and assisted living type homes for the area.  A visual map showing the boundaries of the community is always helpful.  Make a note of whether or not the residences have a large number of real estate signs on them.  Supportive data could also include:

· any specific areas (and the size of the area) in which houses were in disrepair,

· how many homes were for sale

· how many single-family homes in comparison to multi-family dwellings or senior living complexes,

· average home market price,

· any data regarding proportion of young families with children compared to retirees

· any changes in residency, recent trends in real estate (are the new construction homes build where previous existing homes were torn down? Or was there still available space in this established community?)


Open Space: 
Determine the open spaces throughout the community, including vacant lots, green spaces, undeveloped areas, nature areas, and parks.  Supportive data could also include: 

· How many open spaces, parks, or green spaces are available? 

· Does the community appear to be focused on open space availability, parks, divided streets with trees or landscapes parkways?

· Are there minimum lot sizes? 

· How many of these parks and green spaces are park district owned?

· How many of these are City owned?

· How many of these are State owned? Forest preserve district owned?

· Are the people really utilizing the available spaces?


“Commons”:
  Commons refers to areas or establishments in which people gather, socialize, spend leisure time, or use for recreation (e.g. walking, biking, and walking their dogs).  What are the most popular neighborhood hangouts and what subgroup(s) of the population are drawn to those particular places to hang out? Supportive data may include:

· The “closed” hang out places that may be unfriendly to strangers or newcomers?

· Is there any gang activity?

· Popular bars or nightlife?

· Places that draw younger people (Jr. High, high school)?


Safety:
Is the community safe? Environmental aspects or physical aspects that may compromise safety (e.g. community decay, traffic safety issues, road and sidewalk accessibility and quality, crime rates, lighting, safe drinking water, air quality). How do the community safety issues impact your identified community problem or issue?

Signs of community decay:  Identify any areas of the community in which there is evidence of decline of resources, or community decay?

· Abandoned cars,

· Visible trash in the street,

· Levels of noticeable pollution,

· Abandoned houses, businesses, and unfinished structures (boarded up buildings),

· Increased numbers of homeless or panhandlers


Media:
Identify the types of local media available for the community residents.  Does the town have its own paper?  Does the area have its own cable television station?  What types of magazines and print materials are circulated?  (These types of things you will usually find in the front of cafes and stores). Are they bilingual to needs of community?   Do you notice outdoor antennas or dishes?


Stores, Services and Service Centers:
  Evaluate the service industry in the area including various stores and businesses within the community, social service agencies, community outreach programs, recreation centers, e.g. a local YMCA, and other service industries. The community health nurse should analyze access to food, fitness, and health services availability.

· What is your evaluation of the availability of resources/stores? 

· Are there many fast food restaurants in comparison to healthier restaurants?

· Is this considered a food desert? 

· Are there significantly more entertainment options (movie theaters, bowling alleys, etc.) than green space? 

· Are there a high number of fitness and exercise service centers? 

· What is your evaluation of the services available?


Schools:
Describe the educational system for the community including public, private, and alternative schools. Supportive evidence is helpful for the community nurse to make assessments about the community.  Remember schools range from pre-schools to colleges and universities. Supportive data may include:

· How many schools are in the area and which level of student to they serve?

· How many private school options are there in this community? What types of private institutions are represented (religious affiliation, Montessori, academic driven)?

· What are the public schools rating/ranking?

· What is the high school graduation rate? How does it compare to the state or national averages?


Transportation:
Include photos of cars, buses, trains, ferries, trolleys, bicycles, and pedestrians.  Photos of people utilizing the various types of transportation would be appropriate for your windshield survey.  Noting the safety measures (bike lanes, safe crosswalks, etc.) is helpful.   Which type(s) of transportation seems to be the most predominant in the community? 

· Is the public transportation accessible and provide good transportation options for community residents?

· Where is the closest/local airport?

· What are the major highways that are close to the area?


Health Status of the Community
: Evaluate the vital health statistics for the area. For example, note what mortality rates are. And morbidity rates for chronic conditions in particular.  Is there a specific health problem with a high incidence/prevalence rate in the community or a health problem within the community related to the environment (e.g. a problem of air pollution and high community rates of respiratory infection)? Is there high risk of non -communicable disease (e.g. Lead exposure)? Are there high risks of communicable diseases? (e.g. Tuberculosis; Covid-19)


Case Management:
How is the community health presently being monitored? What current collaboration is taking place and what is required to provide continuity of care in the community treatment plan? What stakeholders can you identify? Include Federal, State, local, and private agencies that may be involved. Include the major hospitals and identified that medical/dental/vision/addiction services were readily available. Are there any collected statistics and data to show how readily available healthcare services are in the community? How are people with minimal or no insurance provided care or access to care?


Part 2: Analysis of Assessment Data

1. Based on your observations from the windshield survey, identify strengths of the community.

2. List and prioritize 5 potential community risk factors (weaknesses).

3. Identify community resources that may help address the highest priority weakness (either currently in existence or something you propose to help address this problem).


Part 3: Presentation

Create a presentation of your findings using the rubric below. The presentation should be visually appealing and well delivered, utilizing technology and media to convey the material. 


Part 4: Peer Review/Compare and Contrast

1. BEFORE the due date, review the presentation of the other students in your clinical group.

2. Critically assess each other’s presentation and offer suggestions for improvement to meet all elements of rubric.

3. Compare your results with the results from the other section of your clinical group. Notice similarities and differences in categories assessed. Pay special attention to health outcomes (morbidity, mortality, incidence of disease) and demographic differences (race, ethnicity, income levels).

4. Summarize your comparison and provide a reflection on this experience (2 paragraphs minimum) to identify lessons learned.

5. Submit ALL sections (Parts 1-4) by assignment due date.

Grading Rubric:

Presentation

Possible Points

Points

Earned

Comments

Discusses each of the 15 elements succinctly

Total of 75 points.

Race and Ethnicity

5

Culture

5

Religion

5

Politics

5

Boundaries

5

Housing and Zoning

5

Open Space

5

“Commons”

5

Safety

5

Media

5

Stores, Service Centers

5

Schools

5

Transportation

5

Health Status of the Community

5

Case Management

5

Community Strengths

5

Community Weaknesses/Risk Factors

5

Community resources to address highest priority risk factor

5

Reflection on comparison of neighborhoods

· Health outcomes comparison (2.5)

· Demographic comparison (2.5)

5

Presentation is professional, creative, logically organized, and clear in content. Reflection is provided.

2.5

Correct APA formatting and citations, grammar, spelling.

2.5

Total Points Possible

100



Commons:

There is a high amount of gang of gang activity, there is always some type of shooting or mugging and cops are always patrolling around the neighborhood.

Places that draw younger people are :

· Spry community high school

· Maria sauced academy

· Douglas park

· Pa villa park

· Little village kids town

The most popular bars or nightlife in that area is the volkan night club also known as V Live , they host live music and include dine-in; the subgroup of the population that are drawn to that particular place are latino -american from age 18 and above. Another popular hang-out for families and their kids is the douglas park. Families like to spend time there, they enjoy babercue, play tennis, soccer, walking, and other activities. Another popular place is la cathedral café and restaurant , the subgroup who most go there is couple

The “closed” hang out places that may be unfriendly to strangers or newcomers are

Transportation:

· Is the public transportation accessible and provide good transportation options for community residents? Yes the public transportation is accessible, there is a pink line and CTA bus

· Where is the closest/local airport? Midway airport

· What are the major highways that are close to the area? I-55 and 290


Health Status of the Community
: Evaluate the vital health statistics for the area. For example, note what mortality rates are. And morbidity rates for chronic conditions in particular.  Is there a specific health problem with a high incidence/prevalence rate in the community or a health problem within the community related to the environment (e.g. a problem of air pollution and high community rates of respiratory infection)? Is there high risk of non -communicable disease (e.g. Lead exposure)? Are there high risks of communicable diseases? (e.g. Tuberculosis; Covid-19)

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F R A M E W O R K

MAYOR EMANUEL’S INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR MODERNIZATION

Department of Planning and Development Department of Public Health Department of Transportation

MAYOR EMANUEL’S INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR MODERNIZATION

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Little Village
Industrial Corridor Modernization

1 Executive Summary 1

2 Introduction 4

3 Context 8
Previous Plans 10
Industrial Corridor System 14
Industrial Corridor Employment Trends 16
Existing Land Use 22
Existing Conditions: Transportation 24
Health & Environment Data 25

4 Little Village Framework 28
Goal #1 30
Maintain the Little Village Industrial Corridor as an employment
center
Goal #2 34
Provide better access for all modes within and around the Little
Village Industrial Corridor
Goal #3 38
Incorporate best practices for new development within the Little
Village Industrial Corridor to improve economic, environmental and
social conditions

6 Framework Implementation 44

7 Appendix 50
Existing Planned Developments 52
Health and Environment Data Sources 54
Image Credits 56

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Select aerial photos courtesy of Pictometry

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SUMMARY

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Little Village Industrial Corridor

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EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The Little Village Industrial
Corridor Framework is part
of a comprehensive land use
analysis conducted on Chicago’s
industrial policies and the
26 designated corridors that
encompass the majority of the
city’s industrial landscape. This
Framework is a component
of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s
Industrial Corridor Modernization
Initiative, which is intended
to review each of the city’s
industrial corridors to promote
employment and economic
activity.

Chicago’s industrial corridors are
designated areas with special
land use provisions that support
manufacturing, transportation,
warehousing, and other industrial
uses. Each corridor has unique
assets and characteristics that
collectively function on behalf
of the entire city, in which
companies expand, relocate, and
depend upon each other as their
needs evolve within a changing
economic landscape.

Consisting of 1,252 acres along
the Sanitary and Ship Canal
and Stevenson Expressway
(I-55), the Little Village Industrial
Corridor is part of the first
group of corridors to undergo a
comprehensive planning process
for modern land use needs and
demands. The review is required
due to ongoing corridor issues
involving transitioning land and
continued investment within the
industrial corridor.

The current Little Village
Industrial Corridor planning
framework was developed by
the Department of Planning
and Development (DPD), the
Department of Transportation
(CDOT), and the Department
of Public Health (CDPH) in
conjunction with a working group
of community organizations

and key stakeholders. It is
meant to be immediately
actionable, yet flexible, as the
corridor grows through public
and private investments that
leverage existing assets and
maximize strategic development
opportunities that will benefit
the planning area and the
entire city. The plan is subject
to review and adoption by the
Chicago Plan Commission
as a formal roadmap for the
implementation of its goals and
strategies. Individual projects
and associated funding may
require additional review and
approval by the City Council and
other agencies.

The framework identifies corridor
employment trends over time
and makes recommendations
to encourage industrial
development for continued
employment growth within the
corridor. The recommendations
also address sustainability as
a way to confront the health
and environmental impacts of
potential industrial development
to the neighboring community.
The plan also identifies
infrastructure improvements
to enhance transportation and
circulation and design guidelines
to encourage best practices
for industrial sites within the
industrial corridor.

Improvements identified in
the framework plan, including
infrastructure, transit and open
space, will be implemented
through new and existing
financial tools, including the
industrial corridor fee, Tax
Increment Financing (TIF), state
and federal sources, developer
contributions and other sources.

KEY
RECOMMENDATIONS
Land Use
Re-affirm the industrial corridor
designation for Little Village to
encourage new development
that will provide job growth and
mitigate the impacts of industrial
uses on non-compatible uses by
revising the industrial corridor’s
boundaries. Furthermore, the
framework seeks to continue
to promote economic growth
and job creation through the
expansion of existing businesses
and the attraction of new
businesses.

Transportation
Conduct further planning studies
to analyze freight traffic for the
Little Village Industrial Corridor
and other adjacent Southwest
side industrial corridors in order
to provide strategies to address
the transportation impacts of
future industrial development.
The framework also provides
strategies and proposes specific
infrastructure projects to make
the industrial corridor and
adjacent streets more accessible
and safe for all users.

Sustainability .
As a land use plan for
the industrial corridor, the
Framework sets a vision for
future industrial development
to implement sustainable best
practices, which will ultimately
address issues such as air and
water quality. These strategies
include the implementation of on-
site renewable energy, increased
landscaping and encouraging
the use of alternative fuel
vehicles for industrial operations.
DPD, along with CDPH, is
working toward updating and
modifying tools that it has
readily available to regulate new
industrial development within
the corridor. The Framework
defines sustainability as the
intersection between economic,
environmental and societal

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considerations. The Framework
attempts to provide strategies
that reflect this intersection
and address health and
environmental impacts of
development through the lens of
sustainability

Design Guidelines
Promote the development of
new and expanded industrial
facilities that address the
economic, environmental, social,
cultural and health conditions
of the adjacent community
and the City as whole. The
guidelines associated with the
Little Village Industrial Corridor
and DPD’s updated sustainable
development policy will
incorporate best practices that
address these environmental
issues.

STAKEHOLDER
PARTICIPATION
This Framework is a
summary of the key findings
and recommendations that
developed from the public
process and is complementary
to the materials that were
presented at the public meetings.
A summary of the public
meetings and the concepts
discussed, along with the
presentations from the public
meetings can be found on DPD’s
website here.

Additionally, the Framework
was developed in coordination
with the Pilsen and Little Village
Preservation Strategy. The
preservation strategy is a
comprehensive, community-
based effort to preserve
the culture, character and
affordability of the community.

Planned for the Pilsen and Little
Village neighborhoods, the multi-
faceted strategy includes:

• Enhanced affordability
requirements for market rate
housing developments

• New housing resources to
help existing residents avoid
displacement caused by
gentrification

• A designated landmark
district to preserve the area’s
unique architecture

• The strategies outlined in
this Framework to increase
sustainable, head-of-
household jobs

• Open space improvements
that enhance neighborhood
character and livability

Participation by community
stakeholders was critical to the
framework planning process.
Initiated in April 2018, public
engagement included input by
more than 100 individuals over
the course of six community
meetings, three working group
meetings and numerous
individual meetings. The offices
of Aldermen George Cardenas,
Alderman Edward Burke,
Alderman Ricardo Munoz, and
Alderman Danny Solis were also
involved in the process.

DPD, CDOT and CDPH
would like to acknowledge the
thoughtful participation of the
following organizations:

• Enlace Chicago

• Esperanza Health Centers

• Hilco

• Latinos Progesando

• Lawndale Business
Renaissance Association

• Little Village Chamber of
Commerce

• Little Village Environmental
Justice Organization

• The Marshall Square
Resource Network

• OPEN Center for the Arts

• Openlands

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INTRODUCTION

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INTRODUCTION
The Industrial Corridor
Modernization Initiative revisits
the purpose and goals of
Chicago’s Industrial corridors
almost 20 years after their initial
designations.

The process for the Little
Village Industrial Corridor
included the review of previous
plans that impact the Little
Village Industrial Corridor
and compared their goals
and projections with existing
conditions, including an analysis
of health and environmental
data. Transportation challenges,
sustainability and infrastructure
within the corridor were defined
as main building blocks for
future growth and investment.

The resulting framework
plan provides a succinct

summary of the purpose and
approach and provides concise
implementation strategies for
improvements that primarily
relate to land use, transportation
and sustainability.

The framework’s three main
goals are to:

• Maintain the Little Village
Industrial Corridor as an
employment center

• Provide better access
for all modes within and
around the Little Village
Industrial Corridor

• Incorporate best practices
for new development
within the Little Village
Industrial Corridor to
improve economic,
environmental and social
conditions

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Map Key
55 Interstate

Metra Line & Station

Orange Line & Station

Little Village Industrial
Corridor Boundary
South Branch Chicago River

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Crawford Power Generation Plant, Pulaski Road & 35th Street

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LITTLE VILLAGE
INDUSTRIAL
CORRIDOR
PREVIOUS
PLANS
At least 10 plans and studies
have been completed
since 2005 that provide
recommendations which are
relevant to the Little Village
Industrial Corridor and its
surrounding area. Some
common themes expressed
in previous plans range from
land use recommendations, to
identifying infrastructure needs
and the need to support and
expand Chicago’s industrial base
and emerging business growth.
The Little Village Framework
has been built around these
recommendations and themes,
while considering the citywide
industrial corridor system. This
Framework supersedes all
previous recommendations in
these plans that pertain to the
Little Village Industrial Corridor.

QUALITY OF LIFE PLAN
2005

Participating Organizations
• Enlace Chicago

Priority Recommendations
• Established recommendations

for new open spaces and Transit
Oriented Development. Also calls
for preservation and enhancement
of the Industrial Corridor.

FISK AND CRAWFORD
REUSE TASK FORCE
REPORT
2012

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

• Delta Institute

Priority Recommendations
• Provides principles and

recommendations for
redevelopment of the Fisk and
Crawford sites.

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MANUFACTURING
INCUBATOR FEASIBILITY
STUDY
2014

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

Priority Recommendations
• Identified demand for new

incubators, especially involving
food

QUALITY OF LIFE PLAN
2013

Participating Organizations
• Enlace Chicago

Priority Recommendations
• Calls for the enhancement and

creation of new open spaces
and the creation of safer, cleaner
physical environments.

CHICAGO SUSTAINABLE
INDUSTRIES
2013*

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

Priority Recommendations
• Established a comprehensive

plan to support and expand
Chicago’s industrial base.
Includes 14 policies and 32
action items.

*Adopted by the Chicago Plan Commission

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BROWNFIELD
REDEVELOPMENT
STRATEGY
2016

Participating Organizations
• The Delta Institute

• Little Village Environmental
Justice Organization

Priority Recommendations
• Presents re-development

scenarios for various vacant sites

SOUTHWEST
INDUSTRIAL CORRIDORS
STUDY
2016

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

Priority Recommendations
• Research on the industrial

sub-market in the Pilsen,
Little Village and Stevenson
Industrial Corridors.

INDUSTRIAL WATERWAY
USAGE SYSTEM
2015

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

Priority Recommendations
• Assessed existing dock

infrastructure for industrial users
along the river

12

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T

PILSEN & LITTLE
VILLAGE ACTION PLAN
2017

Participating Organizations
• Department of Planning and

Development

• Chicago Metropolitan Agency for
Planning (CMAP)

Priority Recommendations
• Summary of issues and

opportunities facing the
communities of Pilsen and
Little Village, focusing specif-
ically on land use, economic
development, open space,
cultural assets, and industrial
land uses.

MSRN COMMUNITY PLAN
2018

Participating Organizations
• Marshall Square Resource

Network

• Chicago Department of Public
Health

Priority Recommendations
• Provides strategies and goals

to address community health
issues

13

3
CO

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TE

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T

90

290

55

90

90

90

57

94

94

94

Calumet

Pilsen

Stockyards

Kinzie

Stevenson

Little Village

Pullman

Northwest

North Branch

Greater Southwest

Armitage

Burnside

Roosevelt/Cicero

Addison

Brighton Park

Knox

Pulaski

Western / Ogden

Harlem

Peterson

West Pullman

Ravenswood

Kennedy

Northwest
Highway

Elston/
Armstrong

Wright
Business

Park

K
E

D
Z

IE
A

V
E

32
00

W

47TH ST
4700 S

63RD ST
6300 S

95TH ST
9500 S

79TH ST
7900 S

71ST ST
7100 S

103RD ST
10300 S

NORTH AVE
1600 N

BELMONT AVE
3200 N

87TH ST
8700 S

91ST ST
9100 S

99TH ST
9900 S

59TH ST
5900 S

107TH ST
10700 S

83RD ST
8300 S

75TH ST
7500 S

115TH ST
11500 S

E
A

S
T

R
IV

E
R

R
D

88
00

W

W
E

S
T

E
R

N
A

V
E

24
00

W

MADISON ST
1 N / 1 S

FULLERTON AVE
2400 N

CHICAGO AVE
800 N

ROOSEVELT RD
1200 S

119TH ST
11900 S

111TH ST
11100 S

CERMAK RD
2200 S

31ST ST
3100 S

TO
R

R
E

N
C

E
A

V
E

26
30

E

AV
E

N
U

E
O

34
30

E

DEVON AVE
6400 N

PERSHING RD
3900 S

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
AV

E
56

00
W

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
PA

R
K

A
V

E
36

00
W

P
U

LA
S

K
I R

D
40

00
W

K
O

S
T

N
E

R
A

V
E

44
00

W

C
IC

E
R

O
A

V
E

48
00

W

W
E

S
T

E
R

N
A

V
E

24
00

W

C
A

LI
F

O
R

N
IA

A
V

E
28

00
W

K
E

D
Z

IE
A

V
E

32
00

W

127TH ST
12700 S

N
A

R
R

A
G

A
N

S
E

T
T

AV
E

64
00

W

138TH ST
13800 S

BRYN MAWR
AVE 5600 N

P
U

LA
S

K
I R

D
40

00
W

S
TO

N
Y

IS
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
E

M
A

N
N

H
E

IM
R

D
10000 W

C
U

M
B

E
R

LA
N

D
A

V
E

84
00

W

LAWRENCE AVE
4800 N

S
TA

T
E

L
IN

E
R

D
41

00
E

C
O

T
TA

G
E

G
R

O
V

E
AV

E

80
0

E

A
S

H
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
W

IRVING PARK RD
4000 N

HOWARD ST
7600 N

55TH ST
5500 S

H
A

LS
T

E
D

S
T

80
0

W

S
TA

T
E

S
T

1
E

/
1

W

C
IC

E
R

O
A

V
E

48
00

W

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

D
A

M
E

N
A

V
E

20
00

W

HARRISON ST
600 S

KINZIE ST
400 N

D
R

M
L

K
IN

G
J

R
D

R
40

0
E

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

O
A

K
P

A
R

K
A

V
E

68
00

W

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
AV

E
53

00
W

A
U

S
T

IN
A

V
E

60
00

W

N
A

G
LE

A
V

E
64

00
W

A
S

H
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
W

CHICAGO
MIDWAY
AIRPORT

CHICAGO
O’HARE

INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT

P
A

C
IF

IC
A

V
E

80
00

W

W
O

O
D

LA
W

N
A

V
E

12
00

E

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
PA

R
K

A
V

E
36

00
W

R
A

C
IN

E
A

V
E

12
00

W

JE
F

F
E

R
Y

A
V

E
20

00
E

ARMITAGE
2000 N

A
U

S
T

IN
A

V
E

60
00

W

MONTROSE AVE
4400 N

35TH ST
3500 S

26TH ST
2600 S

16TH ST
1600 S

PRATT AVE
6800 N

D
A

M
E

N
A

V
E

20
00

W

DIVISION ST
1200 N

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

43RD ST
4300 S

O
A

K
P

A
R

K
A

V
E

68
00

W

LA
R

A
M

IE
A

V
E

52
00

W

51ST ST
5100 W

C
A

LI
F

O
R

N
IA

A
V

E
28

00
W

K
O

S
T

N
E

R
A

V
E

44
00

W

DIVERSEY
AVE 2800 N

PETERSON AVE
6000 N

S
T

E
W

A
R

T
AV

E
40

0
W

O
R

IO
LE

A
V

E
76

00
W

FOSTER AVE
5200 N

MARQUETTE RD
6700 S

ADDISON ST
3600 N

TOUHY AVE
7200 N

Map Key

Expressway
Rail
Major Streets

Existing PMDs
Industrial Corridor

Chicago’s Industrial Corridors &
Planned Manufacturing Districts

94

INDUSTRIAL
CORRIDOR
SYSTEM

Most of Chicago’s industrial
corridor policies date to the early
1990s, when the City started
to identify formal boundaries
around critical industrial areas
as a planning and development
tool that recognized the
importance of manufacturing
and related sub-sectors as part
of a diversified economy. Today,
the City’s 26 formal industrial
corridors range in size from 70
to 3,500 acres. Containing about
12 percent of all city land, they
provide secure and predictable
work environments for
manufacturing and related uses.
Among the key industrial corridor
provisions is a requirement for
the Chicago Plan Commission to
review any zoning change that
departs from a Manufacturing
(M) use, along with standard City
Council review.

The City refined the M zoning
district designation starting in
1988 with the advent of the
Planned Manufacturing District
(PMD) designation, which was
created by the City Council and
applied to portions of select
corridors possessing heavy
industrial uses. PMDs can be a
tool, where appropriate, to foster
the city’s industrial base. The
Little Village Industrial Corridor
does not contain land with the
PMD designation.

14

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This page intentionally left blank.

15

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TE

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CITYWIDE
INDUSTRIAL
EMPLOYMENT
TRENDS
In 2016 the DPD analyzed
job trends in each of the 26
Industrial Corridors using
data from the U.S. Census
Bureau Longitudinal-Employer
Household Dynamics Program
(LEHD) from 2002 – 2014, which
was downloaded using the
OnTheMap online application.
The initial analysis focused on
Core Jobs and was based on
the methodology developed
for the Chicago Sustainable
Industries plan and the Fulton
Market Innovation District
Plan. Core jobs were defined
as those employment sectors
that are most associated with
the Industrial Corridor System.
DPD analyzed the census data
by grouping individual 2-digit
NAICS sectors with similar
sectors. Each industrial corridor
was classified based on the
predominant core jobs category
listed below.

Core Jobs Classifications

• Manufacturing

• Moving, Storing Goods
and Materials, Utilities, and
Construction

• Information, Technology, and
Management

• Business Support Services.

From 2002 to 2014,
Manufacturing and Moving
and Storing of Goods and
Services were the predominant
core job types in many of the
industrial corridors on the South,
Southwest and West sides of the
City. Meanwhile, six corridors
on the Near West, Northwest
and North sides experienced
a significant transition toward
other core job types, including
Information & Technology and

Business-to-Business.

A more in-depth analysis was
completed to determine the
composition of other job sectors
as part of the framework plan
that was developed for the
North Branch Industrial Corridor.
The analysis added 3 jobs
classifications based on the
2-digit NAICS codes.

Additional Jobs Classifications

• F.I.R.E. (Finance, Insurance,
& Real Estate), Education, and
Health Care

• Leisure and Hospitality

• Other

The Census data is useful to
compare jobs between industrial
corridors and between Chicago
and other cities or to measure
where people live that work in a
particular geography. However,
the Census data is limited in
industry detail and timeframe. In
2018 DPD gained access to the
Quarterly Census of Employment
and Wages (QCEW) provided
by the Illinois Department of
Employment Security through
a shared data agreement.
This new data includes recent
employment counts, from 2005-
2017. The QCEW data also
includes more detailed NAICS
classifications associated with the
employment counts (see page
19).

16

3 CO
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90

290

55

90

90

90

57

94

94

94

Calumet

Pilsen

Stockyards

Kinzie

Stevenson

Little Village

Pullman

Northwest

North Branch

Greater Southwest

Armitage

Burnside

Roosevelt/Cicero

Addison

Brighton Park

Knox

Pulaski

Western / Ogden

Harlem

Peterson

West Pullman

Ravenswood

Kennedy

Northwest
Highway

Elston/
Armstrong

Wright
Business

Park

K
E

D
Z

IE
A

V
E

32
00

W

47TH ST
4700 S

63RD ST
6300 S

95TH ST
9500 S

79TH ST
7900 S

71ST ST
7100 S

103RD ST
10300 S

NORTH AVE
1600 N

BELMONT AVE
3200 N

87TH ST
8700 S

91ST ST
9100 S

99TH ST
9900 S

59TH ST
5900 S

107TH ST
10700 S

83RD ST
8300 S

75TH ST
7500 S

115TH ST
11500 S

E
A

S
T

R
IV

E
R

R
D

88
00

W

W
E

S
T

E
R

N
A

V
E

24
00

W

MADISON ST
1 N / 1 S

FULLERTON AVE
2400 N

CHICAGO AVE
800 N

ROOSEVELT RD
1200 S

119TH ST
11900 S

111TH ST
11100 S

CERMAK RD
2200 S

31ST ST
3100 S

TO
R

R
E

N
C

E
A

V
E

26
30

E

AV
E

N
U

E
O

34
30

E

DEVON AVE
6400 N

PERSHING RD
3900 S

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
AV

E
56

00
W

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
PA

R
K

A
V

E
36

00
W

P
U

LA
S

K
I R

D
40

00
W

K
O

S
T

N
E

R
A

V
E

44
00

W

C
IC

E
R

O
A

V
E

48
00

W

W
E

S
T

E
R

N
A

V
E

24
00

W

C
A

LI
F

O
R

N
IA

A
V

E
28

00
W

K
E

D
Z

IE
A

V
E

32
00

W

127TH ST
12700 S

N
A

R
R

A
G

A
N

S
E

T
T

AV
E

64
00

W

138TH ST
13800 S

BRYN MAWR
AVE 5600 N

P
U

LA
S

K
I R

D
40

00
W

S
TO

N
Y

IS
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
E

M
A

N
N

H
E

IM
R

D
10000 W

C
U

M
B

E
R

LA
N

D
A

V
E

84
00

W

LAWRENCE AVE
4800 N

S
TA

T
E

L
IN

E
R

D
41

00
E

C
O

T
TA

G
E

G
R

O
V

E
AV

E

80
0

E

A
S

H
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
W

IRVING PARK RD
4000 N

HOWARD ST
7600 N

55TH ST
5500 S

H
A

LS
T

E
D

S
T

80
0

W

S
TA

T
E

S
T

1
E

/
1

W

C
IC

E
R

O
A

V
E

48
00

W

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

D
A

M
E

N
A

V
E

20
00

W

HARRISON ST
600 S

KINZIE ST
400 N

D
R

M
L

K
IN

G
J

R
D

R
40

0
E

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

O
A

K
P

A
R

K
A

V
E

68
00

W

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
AV

E
53

00
W

A
U

S
T

IN
A

V
E

60
00

W

N
A

G
LE

A
V

E
64

00
W

A
S

H
LA

N
D

A
V

E
16

00
W

CHICAGO
MIDWAY
AIRPORT

CHICAGO
O’HARE

INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT

P
A

C
IF

IC
A

V
E

80
00

W

W
O

O
D

LA
W

N
A

V
E

12
00

E

C
E

N
T

R
A

L
PA

R
K

A
V

E
36

00
W

R
A

C
IN

E
A

V
E

12
00

W

JE
F

F
E

R
Y

A
V

E
20

00
E

ARMITAGE
2000 N

A
U

S
T

IN
A

V
E

60
00

W

MONTROSE AVE
4400 N

35TH ST
3500 S

26TH ST
2600 S

16TH ST
1600 S

PRATT AVE
6800 N

D
A

M
E

N
A

V
E

20
00

W

DIVISION ST
1200 N

H
A

R
LE

M
A

V
E

72
00

W

43RD ST
4300 S

O
A

K
P

A
R

K
A

V
E

68
00

W

LA
R

A
M

IE
A

V
E

52
00

W

51ST ST
5100 W

C
A

LI
F

O
R

N
IA

A
V

E
28

00
W

K
O

S
T

N
E

R
A

V
E

44
00

W

DIVERSEY
AVE 2800 N

PETERSON AVE
6000 N

S
T

E
W

A
R

T
AV

E
40

0
W

O
R

IO
LE

A
V

E
76

00
W

FOSTER AVE
5200 N

MARQUETTE RD
6700 S

ADDISON ST
3600 N

TOUHY AVE
7200 N

Map Key

Expressway

Rail

Major Streets

Manufacturing – (Largest number of jobs
are in manufacturing and are stable or
growing)

Manufacturing and Moving & Storing
Goods – (Largest number of jobs in both
manufacturing and the distribution and
storage of goods and are stable or
growing)

Business to Business – (Largest number
of jobs are in business support services
which is increasing with info & tech rising
in east Kinzie)

Info & Tech – (Largest number of jobs are
either information technology and
management or business support
services and are growing in North Branch)

Chicago’s Industrial Corridors Employment Trends

94

17

3
CO

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TE

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T

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

Total
Employment

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

Goods Producing

Industrial Related
Services

Office Related
Services

Education and
Health Care
Services

Retail, Hospitality
and Entertainment
Services

Little Village Industrial Corridor – Total Employment (2005-2017)

Little Village Industrial Corridor – Employment by Sector (2005-2017)

18

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LITTLE VILLAGE
INDUSTRIAL
CORRIDOR
EMPLOYMENT
TRENDS
DPD analyzed QCEW data for
the corridor from 2005-2017. The
analysis organized the jobs into
5 categories or sectors that can
be associated with different types
of land uses. The categories are
listed below.

Goods Producing – businesses
that produce goods from raw
materials or other materials. This
category includes sectors such
as manufacturing, agriculture,
mining and similar businesses.
Goods Producing businesses are
typically associated with industrial
land use categories.

Industrial Related Services –
businesses that primarily provide
services to other businesses and
have operations that typically
involve industrial space like a
warehouse, outdoor storage
or activities. This category
includes companies related to
transportation, warehousing,
wholesale, construction,
utilities, waste related services,
commercial equipment rentals,
security services, pest control,
maintenance services, caterers,
and similar businesses. Industrial
Related Services are typically
associated with industrial,
transportation, utility and auto
related land use categories.

Office Related Services
– businesses that provide
services to other businesses and
individuals in an office setting.
This category includes companies
related to information, technology,
research and development,
finance, insurance, real estate,
leasing services, doctor and
dental offices, travel agents,
employment services, nonprofit
organization offices, and similar
businesses. Office Related

Services are typically associated
with commercial land use
categories.

Education and Health Care
Services – businesses and
organizations providing education
and health care services in large
buildings and/or campus like
settings. This category includes
Primary and Secondary Schools,
Colleges and Universities,
business and trade schools,
hospitals and other health
care centers, residential care
facilities, and similar businesses.
Education and Health Care
are typically associated with
schools and institutional land use
categories.

Retail, Hospitality and
Entertainment Services
– businesses that provide
retail, personal, hospitality
and entertainment services
in commercial areas. This
sector includes retail stores,
hotels, restaurants, salons,
theaters, bars, and similar
businesses. Retail, Hospitality
and Entertainment are typically
associated with …

1 2014 American Community Survey five-year estimates.

A Look at Little Village
Sinai Community Health Survey 2.0

Did you know?

POPULATION

72,881

29

33

Little Village is known as the “Mexico of the
Midwest” and is famous for its annual Mexican
Independence Day Parade.

Little Village’s 26th street is a vibrant, bustling
commercial strip, boasting Chicago’s second-highest

The Arch on 26th street is a classic landmark of Little
Village, welcoming newcomers to the neighborhood
with terra cotta tile and bright paintings.

RACE/ETHNICITY

26th Street Arch

Chicago

Little Village

Who lives in Little Village?1

What shapes wellbeing?

Metra Line

C
icero A

ve.

W
estern A

ve.

Stevenson Expressway

Little Village

Health
Outcomes

Physical
Environment

Clinical Care Health
Behaviors

Social and
Economic Factors

3%
3%

2%
Non-Hispanic Black

Mexican

Non-Hispanic White

Puerto Rican

Other80%

12%

Open space1

Little Village:

Chicago:

1%

7%

Vacant land2

Little Village:

Chicago:

8%

5%

felt unsafe alone
during the daytime

Among adults:

27%

felt unsafe alone
during the nighttime

63%

Physical Environment
A community’s physical environment, such as open green space, housing quality, and safety, can greatly
impact the health of its residents. To reduce health inequities, we must consider the role the environment
plays in shaping health.

1 Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning Parcel-Based Land Use Inventory, 2013. Includes green space, parks, and space reserved for recreational activity.
2 Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning Parcel-Based Land Use Inventory, 2013. Includes vacant residential, commercial, and industrial land as well as areas under construction.
3 2014 American Community Survey five-year estimates.
All results on this page are for adults aged 18 years and older unless otherwise specified.

Vacant

Housing units3

Owner-occupied Built before 1940

18%

14%

35%

45%

81%

45%

Little Village:

Chicago:

Little Village:

Chicago:

Little Village:

Chicago:Use public transit
as their main way
to get to work3

Little Village:

Chicago:

17%

29%

1 2014 American Community Survey five-year estimates. Includes individuals aged 16 and older that are in the workforce.
2 2014 American Community Survey five-year estimates.
All results on this page are for adults aged 18 years and older unless otherwise specified.

Social and Economic Factors
control and impact health behaviors, access to care, and community health as a whole.

have ever been homeless7%

Among men:

report that force was used
during their last police stop

13%

have been arrested, booked, or
charged since the age of 18

28%

report that racial or ethnic
profiling by police is extremely
or very common

61%

of adults are unemployed 115%

Of those employed, weekly hours
worked across all of their jobs:

35 to <48 hours

48 or more hours

<35 hours

Highest Educational Attainment2

High School Diploma

Bachelor’s Degree

Less than High
School Diploma

Median Household Income2

Little Village:

Chicago:

$30,248

$47,831

21%

54%

24%

54%40%

6%

In the past year:

yet only

of households received
food stamp benefits

50%

45% of households were
food insecure

15% accessed
emergency food

Clinical Care
Access to health care is a basic human right and a necessity for improving health outcomes. Yet, current
policies have resulted in unequal access and quality of clinical care for underserved communities.

breast cancer473%
cervical cancer367%

colorectal cancer244%

report being treated unfairly in the past year by a health
care professional because of their race, ethnicity, or color5

30%

report having a routine
check-up in the past year

53%

have a usual place
to go for health care

77%

1 Among adults aged 18 to 64.
2 Percent of adults aged 50-75 who reported having a colonoscopy in the past 10 years, or a sigmoidoscopy in the past 5 years with a blood stool test in the past 3 years, or a blood stool test in the

past year.
3 Percent of women aged 21-65 years who have not had a hysterectomy and who report having a pap test within the past 3 years.
4 Percent of women aged 50-74 who reported having a mammogram in the past two years.
5 Among those who saw a health care professional in the last year.
All results on this page are for adults aged 18 years and older unless otherwise specified.

Percent meeting cancer
screening recommendations:

Health Insurance Coverage1

public
insurance

private
insurance

uninsured
35%

30%

34%

did not get needed
prescriptions

In the past year:

Among adults:

due to cost

10%

did not get needed
dental care

did not get needed
eyeglasses

25%

22%

eat less than
1 serving of
fruit

39%
eat less than 1
serving of
vegetables

27%
drink 1 or
more soda

35%

report excessive
alcohol use in the
past month1

19%

report ever being emotionally or
physically abused by their partner
or someone important to them

of men

of women
21%

11%
This likely underestimates
intimate partner violence,
which is o�en underreported

report no physical activity outside
of work in the past month2

40%

smoke
15%

1 Per CDC, excessive drinking is binge drinking (4+ drinks for women, 5+ drinks for men during a single occasion) or heavy drinking (8+ drinks for women/week, 15+ drinks for men/week).
2 500 Cities Project (CDC, BRFSS, 2014).
All results on this page are for adults aged 18 years and older unless otherwise specified.

Every day:

Health Behaviors
Health behaviors are the actions people take that influence their health. Although these behaviors are
traditionally considered the primary cause of health outcomes, they are o�en the result of economic
and environmental factors which must be addressed at the city, state, or national level.

used cocaine, crack cocaine,
heroin, methamphetamine, or
prescription painkillers that
were not prescribed by a
medical professional

11%

used marijuana23%

In the past year:

Community Health Outcomes
Health outcomes provide a snapshot of community health. However, to truly understand health and wellbeing,
we must remember to examine health behaviors, access to clinical care, social and economic factors, and the
physical environment.

About Sinai Survey 2.0

report fair or poor health

have current depressive
symptoms

have current PTSD
symptoms

Sinai Community Health Survey 2.0 (Sinai Survey 2.0) was conducted by Sinai Urban
Health Institute, a member of Sinai Health System. With over 500 questions on 50
topics, Sinai Survey 2.0 is one of the largest community-driven, face-to-face health
surveys ever conducted in Chicago. A representative sample of residents from nine
Chicago community areas completed interviews from March 2015 through
September 2016. Results presented in this health profile are for adults aged 18 years
and older. To learn more about Sinai Survey 2.0 and see information on other
surveyed communities, visit www.sinaisurvey.org.

Sinai Survey 2.0 community health profiles were funded by generous donations from
The Chicago Community Trust and Healthy Communities Foundation.

are obese

tried to lose weight
in the past year

consider themselves
underweight or the
right weight

44%

33%

57%

28%

have been diagnosed
with diabetes

15%

13%

13%

have given birth to a low
birth weight baby (<5lb 8oz)

have had a baby born
prematurely (<37 weeks)

10%

24%

1 Restricted to women who have ever had a live birth.
All results on this page are for adults aged 18 years and older unless otherwise specified.

Of these:

Among mothers:1