+1443 776-2705 panelessays@gmail.com

 

Respond to the following questions in your own words. Your responses should include specific examples and should incorporate concepts and terms from Chapter 21 in your textbook.

  1. Describe the steps that you should take to determine the credibility of a print source.
  2. How do the steps that you take to determine the validity and credibility of an online source differ from the steps you take for print sources? Give specific examples by comparing and contrasting sources you have encountered in your research. Your response should be 2-3 paragraphs.
  3. This paper must contain at least five paragraphs, a references page, and a title page. Be sure to follow APA style. Recall that your paper must include at least three reliable sources: at least one of the sources must be a book and one must be a scholarly article. Use the steps you describe in #1 above to consider the reliability of the sources you have chosen.

Requirements

3 pages

cover page 

introduction

abstract

APA (page margins / header footer / Running head….. etc)

conclusion

references

no plagiarism 

 

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e

Chapter Twenty-One

Using the Library and the Internet

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e

John Langan

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 2

Using the Library and the Internet

For most research topics, you

need to master two basic tasks:

1) finding books on your topic, and 2) finding articles on your topic.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 3

Using the Library and the Internet

Two main avenues for finding books and articles are

1) the library and 2) the Internet.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 4

The Library

The heart of any library consists of the following: • the main desk • the book stacks, and • the catalog of holdings.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 5

The Library

• The main desk is usually located in a central spot.

• In addition to checking out books there, you can usually also find information on the layout and services of the library.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 6

The Library

Books, bound periodicals, and

some other materials are kept in the library’s stacks.

Some stacks are closed to students; in

these cases, you need to fill out a form to

request material.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 7

The Library

The catalog of holdings is a list of all the materials available

in the library.

Formerly made up of cards in a set of drawers, catalogs today are usually computerized.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 8

The Library

You can use the catalog to look up a book in one of three ways:

1) by author, 2) by title, or 3) by subject.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 9

The Library

Here is a sample catalog entry: Author: Hersch, Patricia.

Title: A tribe apart : a journey into the heart of

American adolescence

Edition: 1st ed.

Description: 391 p. ; 25 cm.

Published: New York : Fawcett Columbine, 1998.

LC Subjects: Teenagers –United States.

Location: GIBBSBORO

Call Number: HQ796 .H43 1998

Circulation Data: Overdue as of 05/31/2000

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 10

The Library

If you are researching a topic, you should do a subject search, which can provide • a list of books on a given topic, • related topics, and • more limited topics, if you need help narrowing yours.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 11

The Library To locate periodical articles on your topic, you need to search periodicals indexes such as the Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature.

Most of these are now available in a digital database.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 12

Here is a sample entry in a periodicals index:

Diet

Cancer and Diet G. Cowley. il Newsweek

60-66 N 30 ‘98

subject title

author

periodical

page numbers “illustrated” date

The Library

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 13

As with a book search, if you are researching a topic, you

should use the indexes to do a subject search first.

The Library

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 14

You can also use the periodicals indexes to look up a specific article by author or by title.

The Library

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 15

Once you have located the

book(s) and periodical(s) you need, you can proceed to the stacks (or request the materials).

The Library

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 16

The Internet

The Internet is a giant network that connects computers at tens of

thousands of institutions around the

world.

If you have an Internet connection, you have vast amounts of information literally at your

fingertips.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 17

The Internet

Your libraries — school and/or public — might well be online, in which case their catalogs and possibly digital databases (including periodicals indexes) might be available online.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 18

The Internet

If not, many large research libraries, public and private, offer limited

access to their catalogs and

databases. Try these: •www.columbia.edu (Columbia University) •www.loc.gov (Library of Congress) •www.nypl.org (New York Public Library)

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 19

The Internet

Major online booksellers such as Amazon.com are easy to search and offer information on a vast

number of books, both in- and

out-of-print.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 20

The Internet

Just as in the case of library catalogs

and indexes, the Internet also allows you to research a topic by subject.

Search engines, which organize websites by

categories, can be invaluable in such searches. Try Google.com or Yahoo.com.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 21

The Internet

Search engines (Google, Yahoo and many others) will find websites that relate to your topic.

The key to useful searches is the search terms you use. Use “quotation marks” and +plus- and -minus-signs to limit the number of “hits” your search yields.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 22

The Internet

For example, if you want to know

something about someone named “Robert Lee” (not the U.S. General),

you might type in +Robert Lee -“Robert E. Lee”

This would eliminate many of the sites that

discuss the General.

© 2014 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter 21

College Writing Skills with Readings, 9/e 21 – 23

Unlike traditional publishing, the Internet has virtually no safeguards in place to keep dishonest and/or incompetent people from publishing their

work.

WARNING: You must take extra care to EVALUATE websites you intend to use for research.

The Internet