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Response to each person 200 words each

1) 

Preparing for disasters is something many only think about during "that season"; hurricane season, winter blizzards, tornadoes , fire, flooding etc. however, disasters can happen at any time, so continued and sustained preparedness is essential.

       For the most part I knew my level of preparedness as I've lived in many areas of the world where "that season" happened on a regular basis.  Essential documents stored in plastic bins, easily accessible to place in to a car in the event of needed evacuation or sheltering in place, food, water, medical documents as well; only once I was not prepared but many things were happening in my life at that time which caught me off guard.  I worked a disaster relief effort with the American Red Cross in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in southern Florida and learned many things due to that experience and my time in the military has prepared me for many other man-made disasters.

       We have recently moved to the southwest and I now own a home again, so we are not quite as prepared as we were previously as a homeowner.  The tools and supplies needed to secure my home at this time are lacking so this is a step in preparation that must be accomplished, otherwise, based on the checklist, I am still prepared for nearly any disaster that may strike, or at least I would hope to be! 

       From the perspective of a community health nurse; education is the key to disseminating information to community members.  From participating in and education regarding local flu outbreaks, encouraging vaccinations for those at risk or simple education regarding hand hygiene and the correct way of covering your cough, along with health and wellness to maintain the highest levels of immunity for something as simple yet as deadly as the flu can be, is important.  Man made, natural or environmentally fueled disasters are difficult to disseminate information except through ongoing education or community preparedness sponsored events or work shops.  Ongoing drills within the school systems or community centers will assist in preparedness for disaster specific to the geographical area.  Instructions; written, verbal or expressed for personal preparedness, the how and why, and where to find needed supplies would all begin and continue through education.  Reporting of potential outbreaks or disasters through proper channels would also provide the community with added resources.  In the event of a disaster, nurses would need to assist in identifying who is at risk and what to do regarding those individuals, their friends and families, as would the nurse.  But always keeping in mind the scope of practice and current knowledge base of the nurse.

                                                                                                         References

Clark, M.J. (2015) Population and Community Health Nursing (6th ed). Boston, MA: Pearson

Community Health Nursing in Disaster Management.  Retrieved from (authorstream.com)

How to Prepare for Emergencies.  Retrieved from (redcross.org)

2) 

preparing yourself for disaster is one of the best and smartest things we can all accomplish in life, both as medical field personnel and human beings in general. Disaster preparedness refers to measures taken to prepare for and reduce the effects of disasters. That is, to predict and, where possible, prevent disasters, mitigate their impact on vulnerable populations, and respond to and effectively cope with their consequences. wide efforts to give citizens the training, education, and resources they need to prepare in advance against the threat of a possible local disaster at an individual and collective level. Despite the frequency of stories seen on the news that prove the devastation of unexpected natural disasters or local violence, local governments struggle to impart on citizens the importance of preparedness. The optimistic hope that an unexpected disaster could never destroy one’s home or hurt one’s family, is a difficult misperception to overcome. The goal of community preparedness is to maximize citizens’ awareness of the importance of proactive planning, and encourage participation in disaster preparedness activities. Begin your planning by identifying local emergency response organizations and leaders and asking them to be part of your education and planning efforts. Use all available communication channels to recruit members of your community to participate in your emergency preparedness team. For tips on marketing communications for local government. Once you’ve recruited citizens to participate in your preparedness team, schedule regular meetings that are always open for others to join and attend. The first primary objective of the group should be to develop a disaster preparedness plan. By engaging citizens in the planning process, they will be more likely to encourage friends, family, and neighbors to get involved and will help spread your message of the importance of individual and community preparation. Make sure your emergency planning takes into consideration seniors, children, and community members with special needs. Identify all the senior centers, assisted living facilities, day care centers, schools, and adult day habilitation centers in your community. Work with their leadership to make sure you have a plan in place in the event that such facilities need to be evacuated, or receive urgent care.